Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The worst thing the Tories can do is catch the Ukip bug (Guardian)

Eastleigh punished Cameron for not finishing his modernisation project, says Jonathan Freedland. Now Conservative voters have somewhere else to go.

2. The case of Brussels and banker bonuses (Financial Times)

Europe has found a way to attack the UK that is sure to be favoured by much of the British public, writes Martin Wolf.

3. Two fingers up, but government not down (Times) (£)

The Eastleigh result means Clegg can still work with Cameron, writes Matthew Parris. That’s more important than any UKIP protest vote.

4. I used to argue when people said 'all parties are all the same’. I don’t now (Daily Telegraph)

Voters are punishing politicians who have lost touch with normal human instincts, says Charles Moore.

5. We have a long way to go before our immigration system is fair and simple (Independent)

I support tough controls on immigration, but the government has focused on the wrong end of the stick, says Labour's shadow immigration minister Chris Bryant.

6. Can Cameron prove himself a winner? (Daily Telegraph)

A new path to prosperity is the only means by which the Prime Minister and the Chancellor can return the Tories to favour, says a Telegraph editorial.

7. The west babbles on, and Assad is the winner (Independent)

Talks in Rome did nothing to hide the fact Syria's people have been betrayed, says Robert Fisk.

8. Grotesque myth that Red Ed leads a 'one nation' party (Daily Mail)

This electoral snub proves the party’s complete disconnection from hard-pressed and striving voters in the south of England, says Simon Heffer.

9. Beware of misreading Eastleigh result (Financial Times)

The by-election is a political, not electoral, problem for David Cameron, writes Robert Shrimsley.

10. What Labour could learn from Hollywood (Guardian)

Persona is as important in politics as it is in the movies, writes Marina Hyde. If only Ed Miliband would dump Ed Balls and recast Alistair Darling.

Show Hide image

We're hiring! Join the New Statesman as an editorial assistant

The NS is looking for a new recruit.

The New Statesman is hiring an editorial assistant, who will work across the website and magazine to help the office run smoothly. The ideal candidate will have excellent language skills, a passion for journalism, and the ability to work quickly and confidently under pressure.

The job is a broad one – you will need to understand the requirements of both halves of the magazine (politics and culture) as well as having an interest in the technical requirements of magazine and website production. Experience with podcasts and social media would be helpful.

The right person will have omnivorous reading habits and the ability to assimilate new topics at speed. You will be expected to help out with administration tasks around the office, so you must be willing to take direction and get involved with unglamorous tasks. There will be opportunities to write, but this will not form the main part of the job. (Our current editorial assistant is now moving on to a writing post.)

This is a full-time paid job, which would suit a recent graduate or someone who is looking for an entry into journalism. On the job training and help with career development will be offered.

Please apply with an email to Stephen Bush (Stephen. Bush @ with the subject line ‘Editorial Assistant application’.  

In your covering letter, please include a 300-word analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the New Statesman. Please also include 500 words on what you consider to be the most interesting trend in British politics, and your CV as a Word document. 

The deadline for applications is noon on Monday 12th October.