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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman

1. If we can't afford for people to be disabled, what's the plan? (Guardian)

Those with the greatest needs comprise 2% of the population yet are taking 15% of cuts, writes Zoe Williams. That's more than a loss of dignity.

2. Drinking yourself to death is not a right (Financial Times)

Societies should try to limit alcoholism and obesity, as they have with tobacco use, says John Gapper.

3. Papal conclave: the man from the end of the world (Guardian)

The appointment of Pope Francis is a recognition that the church's future lies not in Europe, or not only in Europe, says a Guardian editorial.

4. Hollande, Cameron and how not to be a leader (Independent)

The French President appears too relaxed, while our PM has the opposite problem, writes Andreas Whittam Smith.

5. The EU’s insidious war on the nation state must be halted (Daily Telegraph)

As a voice of fairness and free trade, Britain can help to remodel the future of Europe, argues Jesse Norman.

6. Germany has one last chance to really save the eurozone (Guardian)

The eurozone's largest economy must try harder, says Timothy Garton Ash. It has far more to lose from a collapse than any other country.

7. A new battle is commencing against the concreting of the English countryside (Daily Mail)

The government’s stance on planning mocks David Cameron’s professed commitment to localism, says Max Hastings. 

8. No 10’s new PR man has Whitehall in a spin (Daily Telegraph)

Alex Aiken has ruffled feathers with a full-on critique of the civil service’s performance, writes Sue Cameron.

9. This pandering to religion can only harm us (Times) (£)

Gender segregation at a small meeting at a British university tells a larger story – of a line we must never cross, writes David Aaronovitch.

10. Beware monetary experimentation (Financial Times)

A little well-targeted fiscal relaxation feels less risky at this stage, writes Martin Taylor.