Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. If we can't afford for people to be disabled, what's the plan? (Guardian)

Those with the greatest needs comprise 2% of the population yet are taking 15% of cuts, writes Zoe Williams. That's more than a loss of dignity.

2. Drinking yourself to death is not a right (Financial Times)

Societies should try to limit alcoholism and obesity, as they have with tobacco use, says John Gapper.

3. Papal conclave: the man from the end of the world (Guardian)

The appointment of Pope Francis is a recognition that the church's future lies not in Europe, or not only in Europe, says a Guardian editorial.

4. Hollande, Cameron and how not to be a leader (Independent)

The French President appears too relaxed, while our PM has the opposite problem, writes Andreas Whittam Smith.

5. The EU’s insidious war on the nation state must be halted (Daily Telegraph)

As a voice of fairness and free trade, Britain can help to remodel the future of Europe, argues Jesse Norman.

6. Germany has one last chance to really save the eurozone (Guardian)

The eurozone's largest economy must try harder, says Timothy Garton Ash. It has far more to lose from a collapse than any other country.

7. A new battle is commencing against the concreting of the English countryside (Daily Mail)

The government’s stance on planning mocks David Cameron’s professed commitment to localism, says Max Hastings. 

8. No 10’s new PR man has Whitehall in a spin (Daily Telegraph)

Alex Aiken has ruffled feathers with a full-on critique of the civil service’s performance, writes Sue Cameron.

9. This pandering to religion can only harm us (Times) (£)

Gender segregation at a small meeting at a British university tells a larger story – of a line we must never cross, writes David Aaronovitch.

10. Beware monetary experimentation (Financial Times)

A little well-targeted fiscal relaxation feels less risky at this stage, writes Martin Taylor.

Photo: Getty Images
Show Hide image

What can you do about Europe's refugee crisis?

The death of a three-year-old boy on a beach in Europe has stirred Britain's conscience. What can you do to help stop the deaths?

The ongoing refugee crisis in the Mediterranean dominates this morning’s front pages. Photographs of the body of a small boy, Aylan Kurdi, who washed up on a beach, have stunned many into calling for action to help those fleeing persecution and conflict, both through offering shelter and in tackling the problem at root. 

The deaths are the result of ongoing turmoil in Syria and its surrounding countries, forcing people to cross the Med in makeshift boats – for the most part, those boats are anything from DIY rafts to glorified lilos.

What can you do about it?
Firstly, don’t despair. Don’t let the near-silence of David Cameron – usually, if nothing else, a depressingly good barometer of public sentiment – fool you into thinking that the British people is uniformly against taking more refugees. (I say “more” although “some” would be a better word – Britain has resettled just 216 Syrian refugees since the war there began.)

A survey by the political scientist Rob Ford in March found a clear majority – 47 per cent to 24 per cent – in favour of taking more refugees. Along with Maria Sobolewska, Ford has set up a Facebook group coordinating the various humanitarian efforts and campaigns to do more for Britain’s refugees, which you can join here.

Save the Children – whose campaign director, Kirsty McNeill, has written for the Staggers before on the causes of the crisis – have a petition that you can sign here, and the charity will be contacting signatories to do more over the coming days. Or take part in Refugee Action's 2,000 Flowers campaign: all you need is a camera-phone.

You can also give - to the UN's refugee agency here, and to MOAS (Migrant Offshore Aid Station), or to the Red Cross.

And a government petition, which you can sign here, could get the death toll debated in Parliament. 

 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.