Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The Prime Minister's speech on the economy asserted the incredible in defense of the indefensible (Independent)

There are many credible alternatives to the current stance of economic policy, which would deal with the deficit while promoting growth, argue David Blanchflower and Adam Posen.

2. Theresa May-nia won’t become contagious (Times) (£)

The Home Secretary has the grit to be an accomplished PM but her lack of warmth will stop her reaching No 10, says Tim Montgomerie.

3. Cameron's days at No 10 may be numbered, but the national agenda is still set by the right (Independent)

The Prime Minister is surrounded by ideological crusaders and they've succeeded in turning the politically impossible into the politically inevitable, says Owen Jones.

4. Britain needs an activist chancellor (Financial Times)

The coalition government should do more to boost growth, says an FT editorial.

5. The Falklands: a vote with no purpose (Guardian)

Britain is alone in the world if it thinks that the Malvinas referendum will decide this dispute, writes Alicia Castro.

6. A good engineer who knows his own limits (Financial Times)

Ben Bernanke’s Fed has been the only serious US economic actor, says Edward Luce.

7. David Cameron may last even as he leads his MPs to their doom (Guardian)

Tory backbenchers fear a repeat of 1997 at the next election. But that doesn't mean any of them have the courage to act on it, writes Gaby Hinsliff.

8. Ed dreams of win... don’t let him in (Sun)

David Cameron has plenty of room for manoeuvre, says Trevor Kavanagh. But he cannot count on the unpopularity of Ed Miliband to hand him victory.

9. Justice is put to the sword by Moscow’s greed and corruption (Daily Telegraph)

The ludicrous 'trial’ of a whistleblower killed for his pains ranks among Russia’s darkest hours, writes Boris Johnson.

10. Liberal Democrats: heartlands (Guardian)

Nick Clegg still feels the sacrifices are worth it, but this is becoming an increasingly difficult line to sustain, says a Guardian editorial.

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.