Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Now the Tories see the reality of public-spending cuts - and they don't like it (Independent)

Public spending can have more benevolent consequences than some ministers dared to realise in 2010, writes Steve Richards. They realise it now.

2. Hugo Chávez: an unfinished revolution (Guardian)

The truth is that there was indeed something of greatness about Chávez, says a Guardian editorial.

3. Hugo Chávez - an era of grand political illusion comes to an end (Independent)

Chávez leaves a Venezuela crippled by poverty, violence and crime, says an Independent editorial.

4. Sir David Nicholson doesn't deserve to be hounded out (Daily Telegraph)

The NHS boss could not have known what was happening on the ground during the Mid Staffs hospital crisis, says Sue Cameron.

5. Let's build more homes - who wouldn't vote for that? (Guardian)

Politicians are trying to dodge it, but the way to heal our warped housing market is to invest for the public benefit again, says Zoe Williams.

6. Welcome signs of life from Chilcot (Independent)

This week provided a rare and fleeting glimpse this week of what the Chilcot report on Iraq might produce, says an Independent editorial.

7. It’s plain what George Osborne needs to do – so just get on and do it (Daily Telegraph)

The politics are tricky, but the Budget must confront some hard economic choices, writes Jeremy Warner.

8. No formula can better a mother’s milk (Financial Times)

Children across Asia are being denied the incalculable benefits of breastfeeding, writes David Pilling. 

9. The US was midwife to Comandante Chávez (Times) (£)

Venezuela’s message is that all people desire liberty, dignity and democracy, writes David Aaronovitch. Treat them as you would be treated.

10. Billionaire’s club has become less exclusive (Financial Times)

Those yearning for recognition of their wealth should consider giving their riches away, writes John Gapper.

#Match4Lara
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#Match4Lara: Lara has found her match, but the search for mixed-race donors isn't over

A UK blood cancer charity has seen an "unprecedented spike" in donors from mixed race and ethnic minority backgrounds since the campaign started. 

Lara Casalotti, the 24-year-old known round the world for her family's race to find her a stem cell donor, has found her match. As long as all goes ahead as planned, she will undergo a transplant in March.

Casalotti was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia in December, and doctors predicted that she would need a stem cell transplant by April. As I wrote a few weeks ago, her Thai-Italian heritage was a stumbling block, both thanks to biology (successful donors tend to fit your racial profile), and the fact that mixed-race people only make up around 3 per cent of international stem cell registries. The number of non-mixed minorities is also relatively low. 

That's why Casalotti's family launched a high profile campaign in the US, Thailand, Italy and the US to encourage more people - especially those from mixed or minority backgrounds - to register. It worked: the family estimates that upwards of 20,000 people have signed up through the campaign in less than a month.

Anthony Nolan, the blood cancer charity, also reported an "unprecedented spike" of donors from black, Asian, ethcnic minority or mixed race backgrounds. At certain points in the campaign over half of those signing up were from these groups, the highest proportion ever seen by the charity. 

Interestingly, it's not particularly likely that the campaign found Casalotti her match. Patient confidentiality regulations protect the nationality and identity of the donor, but Emily Rosselli from Anthony Nolan tells me that most patients don't find their donors through individual campaigns: 

 It’s usually unlikely that an individual finds their own match through their own campaign purely because there are tens of thousands of tissue types out there and hundreds of people around the world joining donor registers every day (which currently stand at 26 million).

Though we can't know for sure, it's more likely that Casalotti's campaign will help scores of people from these backgrounds in future, as it has (and may continue to) increased donations from much-needed groups. To that end, the Match4Lara campaign is continuing: the family has said that drives and events over the next few weeks will go ahead. 

You can sign up to the registry in your country via the Match4Lara website here.

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.