Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. How Labour can fire a missile the Tories’ way (Daily Telegraph)

A promise to scale back Trident would show Ed Miliband is serious about deficit reduction, writes Mary Riddell.

2. Ignore their howls of protest. If bankers leave the country, it would be no loss (Guardian)

They took home unheard of sums, writes Simon Jenkins. Only in Britain do ministers dance to their tune. But public fury cannot be defied for ever.

3. The risky task of relaunching Japan (Financial Times)

The question is whether inflation can be achieved and managed, writes Martin Wolf.

4. Tories sick of the Prime Minister reckon May Day is fast approaching (Independent)

There is something weirdly appealing about the Home Secretary's transition from tortoise to hare, says Matthew Norman. 

5. End of Chávismo spells woe for Castros (Financial Times)

The support Cuba received from Venezuela kept the regime afloat, says William Dobson.

6. Women are now to the left of men. It's a historic shift (Guardian)

Austerity has set female voters against Cameron, but that's only part of a global change shaping the politics of the future, says Seumas Milne.

7. Justice will not be done unless Sir David quits (Daily Telegraph)

Sir David Nicholson was 'absolutely' part of the culture at Stafford Hospital that led to hundreds of patient deaths, says a Telegraph editorial.

8. Honey, I don’t know how to bring up the kids (Times) (£)

Whether you’re a strict parent or a liberal one, it’s all a bit of a guess, writes Daniel Finkelstein. There’s no real evidence to say what works.

9. Atheist Clegg gets an A-plus for hypocrisy (Daily Mail)

By sending his son to the London Oratory School, Nick Clegg is merely following in the footsteps of the biggest hypocrite of them all, Tony Blair, says Sandra Parsons.

10. EU migration: taking the Ukip road (Guardian)

All political parties need credible immigration policies, says a Guardian editorial. But a blundering bidding war is not the route to credibility.

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Theresa May is paying the price for mismanaging Boris Johnson

The Foreign Secretary's bruised ego may end up destroying Theresa May. 

And to think that Theresa May scheduled her big speech for this Friday to make sure that Conservative party conference wouldn’t be dominated by the matter of Brexit. Now, thanks to Boris Johnson, it won’t just be her conference, but Labour’s, which is overshadowed by Brexit in general and Tory in-fighting in particular. (One imagines that the Labour leadership will find a way to cope somehow.)

May is paying the price for mismanaging Johnson during her period of political hegemony after she became leader. After he was betrayed by Michael Gove and lacking any particular faction in the parliamentary party, she brought him back from the brink of political death by making him Foreign Secretary, but also used her strength and his weakness to shrink his empire.

The Foreign Office had its responsibility for negotiating Brexit hived off to the newly-created Department for Exiting the European Union (Dexeu) and for navigating post-Brexit trade deals to the Department of International Trade. Johnson was given control of one of the great offices of state, but with no responsibility at all for the greatest foreign policy challenge since the Second World War.

Adding to his discomfort, the new Foreign Secretary was regularly the subject of jokes from the Prime Minister and cabinet colleagues. May likened him to a dog that had to be put down. Philip Hammond quipped about him during his joke-fuelled 2017 Budget. All of which gave Johnson’s allies the impression that Johnson-hunting was a licensed sport as far as Downing Street was concerned. He was then shut out of the election campaign and has continued to be a marginalised figure even as the disappointing election result forced May to involve the wider cabinet in policymaking.

His sense of exclusion from the discussions around May’s Florence speech only added to his sense of isolation. May forgot that if you aren’t going to kill, don’t wound: now, thanks to her lost majority, she can’t afford to put any of the Brexiteers out in the cold, and Johnson is once again where he wants to be: centre-stage. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.