Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. How Labour can fire a missile the Tories’ way (Daily Telegraph)

A promise to scale back Trident would show Ed Miliband is serious about deficit reduction, writes Mary Riddell.

2. Ignore their howls of protest. If bankers leave the country, it would be no loss (Guardian)

They took home unheard of sums, writes Simon Jenkins. Only in Britain do ministers dance to their tune. But public fury cannot be defied for ever.

3. The risky task of relaunching Japan (Financial Times)

The question is whether inflation can be achieved and managed, writes Martin Wolf.

4. Tories sick of the Prime Minister reckon May Day is fast approaching (Independent)

There is something weirdly appealing about the Home Secretary's transition from tortoise to hare, says Matthew Norman. 

5. End of Chávismo spells woe for Castros (Financial Times)

The support Cuba received from Venezuela kept the regime afloat, says William Dobson.

6. Women are now to the left of men. It's a historic shift (Guardian)

Austerity has set female voters against Cameron, but that's only part of a global change shaping the politics of the future, says Seumas Milne.

7. Justice will not be done unless Sir David quits (Daily Telegraph)

Sir David Nicholson was 'absolutely' part of the culture at Stafford Hospital that led to hundreds of patient deaths, says a Telegraph editorial.

8. Honey, I don’t know how to bring up the kids (Times) (£)

Whether you’re a strict parent or a liberal one, it’s all a bit of a guess, writes Daniel Finkelstein. There’s no real evidence to say what works.

9. Atheist Clegg gets an A-plus for hypocrisy (Daily Mail)

By sending his son to the London Oratory School, Nick Clegg is merely following in the footsteps of the biggest hypocrite of them all, Tony Blair, says Sandra Parsons.

10. EU migration: taking the Ukip road (Guardian)

All political parties need credible immigration policies, says a Guardian editorial. But a blundering bidding war is not the route to credibility.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.