Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. How Labour can fire a missile the Tories’ way (Daily Telegraph)

A promise to scale back Trident would show Ed Miliband is serious about deficit reduction, writes Mary Riddell.

2. Ignore their howls of protest. If bankers leave the country, it would be no loss (Guardian)

They took home unheard of sums, writes Simon Jenkins. Only in Britain do ministers dance to their tune. But public fury cannot be defied for ever.

3. The risky task of relaunching Japan (Financial Times)

The question is whether inflation can be achieved and managed, writes Martin Wolf.

4. Tories sick of the Prime Minister reckon May Day is fast approaching (Independent)

There is something weirdly appealing about the Home Secretary's transition from tortoise to hare, says Matthew Norman. 

5. End of Chávismo spells woe for Castros (Financial Times)

The support Cuba received from Venezuela kept the regime afloat, says William Dobson.

6. Women are now to the left of men. It's a historic shift (Guardian)

Austerity has set female voters against Cameron, but that's only part of a global change shaping the politics of the future, says Seumas Milne.

7. Justice will not be done unless Sir David quits (Daily Telegraph)

Sir David Nicholson was 'absolutely' part of the culture at Stafford Hospital that led to hundreds of patient deaths, says a Telegraph editorial.

8. Honey, I don’t know how to bring up the kids (Times) (£)

Whether you’re a strict parent or a liberal one, it’s all a bit of a guess, writes Daniel Finkelstein. There’s no real evidence to say what works.

9. Atheist Clegg gets an A-plus for hypocrisy (Daily Mail)

By sending his son to the London Oratory School, Nick Clegg is merely following in the footsteps of the biggest hypocrite of them all, Tony Blair, says Sandra Parsons.

10. EU migration: taking the Ukip road (Guardian)

All political parties need credible immigration policies, says a Guardian editorial. But a blundering bidding war is not the route to credibility.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.