Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. David Miliband may be off, but his values still matter (Guardian)

Losing the heir to Blair needn't mean a lurch to the left. His brother Ed knows Labour can only govern from the centre, writes Martin Kettle

2. Food is now the ultimate class signifier (Guardian)

Poor people are being fobbed off with food stamps while the rest of us watch cookery shows and eat fancy ready-meals, writes Suzanne Moore
 

3. The 'reconfiguration' of London is akin to social cleansing (Guardian)

Deliberate housing policies as well as high rents are driving those on low incomes out of London, changing its social fabric, writes Anna Minton
 

4.Cyprus crisis: why do we need banks at all? (Guardian)

The eurozone will do all it can to protect the financial system, at the cost of tremendous social misery. Is there another way? asks Richard Seymour
 
 
A Florence Nightingale image is not enough – the party must accept the need for real reform of the National Health Service, writes Mary Riddell
 
 
Sandie Shaw claims that today, she’d need a private education to make it as a star. Is she right? asks Harry Wallop
 
 
The iPast shall consider effectiveness, fairness and objectivity, and dismiss them, writes John Gapper
 
The interests of the eurozone’s large nations come first, says Christopher Pissarides
 
 
Managers as well as bank customers are feeling the pressure, writes Robert Shrimsley
 

10. New York’s wonder shows planners’ limits (Financial Times)

Unplanned social interactions are the key to vibrant cities and companies, writes John Kay

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Can Philip Hammond save the Conservatives from public anger at their DUP deal?

The Chancellor has the wriggle room to get close to the DUP's spending increase – but emotion matters more than facts in politics.

The magic money tree exists, and it is growing in Northern Ireland. That’s the attack line that Labour will throw at Theresa May in the wake of her £1bn deal with the DUP to keep her party in office.

It’s worth noting that while £1bn is a big deal in terms of Northern Ireland’s budget – just a touch under £10bn in 2016/17 – as far as the total expenditure of the British government goes, it’s peanuts.

The British government spent £778bn last year – we’re talking about spending an amount of money in Northern Ireland over the course of two years that the NHS loses in pen theft over the course of one in England. To match the increase in relative terms, you’d be looking at a £35bn increase in spending.

But, of course, political arguments are about gut instinct rather than actual numbers. The perception that the streets of Antrim are being paved by gold while the public realm in England, Scotland and Wales falls into disrepair is a real danger to the Conservatives.

But the good news for them is that last year Philip Hammond tweaked his targets to give himself greater headroom in case of a Brexit shock. Now the Tories have experienced a shock of a different kind – a Corbyn shock. That shock was partly due to the Labour leader’s good campaign and May’s bad campaign, but it was also powered by anger at cuts to schools and anger among NHS workers at Jeremy Hunt’s stewardship of the NHS. Conservative MPs have already made it clear to May that the party must not go to the country again while defending cuts to school spending.

Hammond can get to slightly under that £35bn and still stick to his targets. That will mean that the DUP still get to rave about their higher-than-average increase, while avoiding another election in which cuts to schools are front-and-centre. But whether that deprives Labour of their “cuts for you, but not for them” attack line is another question entirely. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.

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