Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. David Miliband may be off, but his values still matter (Guardian)

Losing the heir to Blair needn't mean a lurch to the left. His brother Ed knows Labour can only govern from the centre, writes Martin Kettle

2. Food is now the ultimate class signifier (Guardian)

Poor people are being fobbed off with food stamps while the rest of us watch cookery shows and eat fancy ready-meals, writes Suzanne Moore
 

3. The 'reconfiguration' of London is akin to social cleansing (Guardian)

Deliberate housing policies as well as high rents are driving those on low incomes out of London, changing its social fabric, writes Anna Minton
 

4.Cyprus crisis: why do we need banks at all? (Guardian)

The eurozone will do all it can to protect the financial system, at the cost of tremendous social misery. Is there another way? asks Richard Seymour
 
 
A Florence Nightingale image is not enough – the party must accept the need for real reform of the National Health Service, writes Mary Riddell
 
 
Sandie Shaw claims that today, she’d need a private education to make it as a star. Is she right? asks Harry Wallop
 
 
The iPast shall consider effectiveness, fairness and objectivity, and dismiss them, writes John Gapper
 
The interests of the eurozone’s large nations come first, says Christopher Pissarides
 
 
Managers as well as bank customers are feeling the pressure, writes Robert Shrimsley
 

10. New York’s wonder shows planners’ limits (Financial Times)

Unplanned social interactions are the key to vibrant cities and companies, writes John Kay

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Who will win the Copeland by-election?

Labour face a tricky task in holding onto the seat. 

What’s the Copeland by-election about? That’s the question that will decide who wins it.

The Conservatives want it to be about the nuclear industry, which is the seat’s biggest employer, and Jeremy Corbyn’s long history of opposition to nuclear power.

Labour want it to be about the difficulties of the NHS in Cumbria in general and the future of West Cumberland Hospital in particular.

Who’s winning? Neither party is confident of victory but both sides think it will be close. That Theresa May has visited is a sign of the confidence in Conservative headquarters that, win or lose, Labour will not increase its majority from the six-point lead it held over the Conservatives in May 2015. (It’s always more instructive to talk about vote share rather than raw numbers, in by-elections in particular.)

But her visit may have been counterproductive. Yes, she is the most popular politician in Britain according to all the polls, but in visiting she has added fuel to the fire of Labour’s message that the Conservatives are keeping an anxious eye on the outcome.

Labour strategists feared that “the oxygen” would come out of the campaign if May used her visit to offer a guarantee about West Cumberland Hospital. Instead, she refused to answer, merely hyping up the issue further.

The party is nervous that opposition to Corbyn is going to supress turnout among their voters, but on the Conservative side, there is considerable irritation that May’s visit has made their task harder, too.

Voters know the difference between a by-election and a general election and my hunch is that people will get they can have a free hit on the health question without risking the future of the nuclear factory. That Corbyn has U-Turned on nuclear power only helps.

I said last week that if I knew what the local paper would look like between now and then I would be able to call the outcome. Today the West Cumbria News & Star leads with Downing Street’s refusal to answer questions about West Cumberland Hospital. All the signs favour Labour. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.