Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. David Miliband may be off, but his values still matter (Guardian)

Losing the heir to Blair needn't mean a lurch to the left. His brother Ed knows Labour can only govern from the centre, writes Martin Kettle

2. Food is now the ultimate class signifier (Guardian)

Poor people are being fobbed off with food stamps while the rest of us watch cookery shows and eat fancy ready-meals, writes Suzanne Moore
 

3. The 'reconfiguration' of London is akin to social cleansing (Guardian)

Deliberate housing policies as well as high rents are driving those on low incomes out of London, changing its social fabric, writes Anna Minton
 

4.Cyprus crisis: why do we need banks at all? (Guardian)

The eurozone will do all it can to protect the financial system, at the cost of tremendous social misery. Is there another way? asks Richard Seymour
 
 
A Florence Nightingale image is not enough – the party must accept the need for real reform of the National Health Service, writes Mary Riddell
 
 
Sandie Shaw claims that today, she’d need a private education to make it as a star. Is she right? asks Harry Wallop
 
 
The iPast shall consider effectiveness, fairness and objectivity, and dismiss them, writes John Gapper
 
The interests of the eurozone’s large nations come first, says Christopher Pissarides
 
 
Managers as well as bank customers are feeling the pressure, writes Robert Shrimsley
 

10. New York’s wonder shows planners’ limits (Financial Times)

Unplanned social interactions are the key to vibrant cities and companies, writes John Kay

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The SNP retains power as Scottish Labour faces being beaten into third

Ruth Davidson’s Conservative Party looks on track to become the official opposition in Holyrood.

As expected, the SNP have performed well in the Scottish elections, with an increased vote share and some key gains – particularly from Labour in Glasgow, where Nicola Sturgeon’s party took all eight constituency seats. As it stands, they could be on course for a second successive majority in Holyrood, once the list members are fully counted.

The story of the night, though, is the demise of Scottish Labour, which put in its worst ever performance in Scotland (my stalwart liveblogging colleague Stephen Bush points out that it’s the party’s worst result since universal suffrage was introduced in 1928). The party’s vote share was done across Scotland, and the results are sufficiently poor that they could see them fall behind the Conservatives to become the third biggest party north of the border.

Losses for Labour include seat of Eastwood in Glasgow, where Scottish Conservatives deputy leader Jackson Carlaw defeated Ken Macintosh. Labour had held the seat for 17 years, though it had been Conservative beforehand.

Other key losses for Scottish Labour include Dumfriesshire, where they were beaten into third; Renfrewshire South (which went to the SNP); Cowdenbeath, where Gordon Brown's old constituency manager and protégé Alex Rowley also lost to the SNP; Glasgow Pollok, where former Scottish Labour leader Johann Lamont lost to the SNP’s Humza Yousaf. There was a close call for Labour’s Jackie Baillie in Dumbarton, where she held on by just 109 votes.

Rare successes came in Edinburgh Southern, where Daniel Johnson took the seat from the SNP’s Jim Eadie (although since the seat is effectively a four-way marginal, it’s not a particularly indicative gain), and East Lothian, where former Scottish Labour leader Iain Gray managed to increase a previously slender majority.

Speaking to the BBC, Scottish Labour leader Kezia Dugdale said:

“A very bad night for the Labour party… There’s no doubt that the constitution has dominated this election.”

She also confirmed that “no matter what, 100 per cent, I will remain leader of the Scottish Labour party”.

In a great night for her party, Ruth Davison won her seat in Edinburgh Central, making her the first Scottish Conservative leader not to need the list system to enter the Scottish Parliament  since 2005. The Tories also gained Aberdeen West from the SNP as well as their success in Dumfriesshire.

The Liberal Democrats also had a better-than-expected night. Their leader, Willie Rennie, took the Fife North East seat from the SNP, and his party also had comfortable holds in Orkney and Shetland.

Caroline Crampton is web editor of the New Statesman.