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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman

1. David Miliband may be off, but his values still matter (Guardian)

Losing the heir to Blair needn't mean a lurch to the left. His brother Ed knows Labour can only govern from the centre, writes Martin Kettle

2. Food is now the ultimate class signifier (Guardian)

Poor people are being fobbed off with food stamps while the rest of us watch cookery shows and eat fancy ready-meals, writes Suzanne Moore
 

3. The 'reconfiguration' of London is akin to social cleansing (Guardian)

Deliberate housing policies as well as high rents are driving those on low incomes out of London, changing its social fabric, writes Anna Minton
 

4.Cyprus crisis: why do we need banks at all? (Guardian)

The eurozone will do all it can to protect the financial system, at the cost of tremendous social misery. Is there another way? asks Richard Seymour
 
 
A Florence Nightingale image is not enough – the party must accept the need for real reform of the National Health Service, writes Mary Riddell
 
 
Sandie Shaw claims that today, she’d need a private education to make it as a star. Is she right? asks Harry Wallop
 
 
The iPast shall consider effectiveness, fairness and objectivity, and dismiss them, writes John Gapper
 
The interests of the eurozone’s large nations come first, says Christopher Pissarides
 
 
Managers as well as bank customers are feeling the pressure, writes Robert Shrimsley
 

10. New York’s wonder shows planners’ limits (Financial Times)

Unplanned social interactions are the key to vibrant cities and companies, writes John Kay