Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Do people get Osborne and co yet? Even Thatcher wouldn't have gone this far (Guardian)

Many still don't realise how far this government is bent on dismantling the public realm, says Polly Toynbee. Labour has to show us a way out.

2. Our fortunes rest on the Bank’s great money-printing machine (Daily Telegraph)

There were two Budgets delivered this week – and it’s the second one involving the Bank of England that really matters, says Fraser Nelson.

3. Homes ruse will not rebuild the economy (Financial Times)

The market cannot sensibly finance such high loan-to-value ratios, says Martin Wolf.

4. Osborne should stick to what he does best . . . (Times)

... and that’s not being Chancellor, says Philip Collins. This government badly needs a full-time political strategist to stop the rot.

5. Barack Obama's mission for Israel (Guardian)

The US president has learned from his first-year follies, writes Aluf Benn. But are we Israelis smart enough to listen to his message?

6. If Cyprus falls into Putin's grip, the West will have lost the first battle in the new Cold War (Daily Mail)

The Russian president sees the humiliation of the hated west as the prime goal in his desire to restore his country's greatness, writes Edward Lucas.

7. Erdogan should pursue lasting truce with the PKK (Independent)

The conflict between Turkey's government and its Kurdish population will only get worse if no agreement is reached, writes Patrick Cockburn. A ceasefire might last this time.

8. Middle East needs more than fine words (Financial Times)

John Kerry’s good intentions are worthless if the US president is not ready to take risks, writes Philip Stephens.

9. An ambiguous Archbishop (Independent)

Dr Welby knows that changing views within the Anglican Communion is akin to turning an oil tanker, says an Independent editorial.

10. George Osborne's sugar pills won't heal the pain, but Julia Gillard's may (Guardian)

The placebo effect has its place beyond medicine – as long as those who soothe us do so with our best interests at heart, writes Gaby Hinsliff.

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Donald Trump is definitely the Republican presidential candidate

Previously unpledged delegates have revealed their support for the billionaire, taking him past the delegate tally required.

Donald Trump has attained the number of delegates required to become the Republican Party’s presidential nominee. According to Associated Press, Trump has reached 1,238 delegates, one more than needed to secure his place as the Republican candidate in November’s general election.

Trump has been the presumptive Republican nominee since early May, when his last remaining rivals Ted Cruz and John Kasich suspended their campaigns. Still, with five primaries still to come and some delegates not required to reveal their preference until the Republican national convention in July, Trump was not quite over the line.

Associated Press has calculated that Trump is in fact now secure as nominee after speaking to previously unpledged delegates who revealed their support for the bombastic billionaire. Trump, whose candidacy was initially seen as a publicity stunt, has so far come top in 34 of the primary and caucus contests.  

On the Democratic side, Bernie Sanders has vowed to continue to pursue the party’s presidential nomination to the party’s convention, where delegates are officially allocated and the party’s candidate declared. However, Sanders currently has the support of just 1,539 delegates compared to Hillary Clinton’s 2,305, with 2,383 needed for the nomination. 

Henry Zeffman writes about politics and is the winner of the Anthony Howard Award 2015.