Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. This budget is just as I feared (Guardian)

Only growth can save us from a lost decade, says Alistair Darling. But George Osborne is risking not just recession but depression.

2. Labour made the mess, but the Tories are only making it worse (Daily Telegraph)

The ugly truth is that there appears to be no political solution to the calamity facing us all, says Peter Oborne.

3. Shrewd politics hides brutal economics (Financial Times)

The Chancellor cannot disguise that economic outcomes are drifting further from expectations, writes Martin Wolf.

4. Trapped by his own ideology, the Chancellor is lonelier than ever (Independent)

Cabinet ministers are becoming more assertive, behind the scenes and publicly, writes Steve Richards.

5. Why we should be cautious about cheering on Cyprus's no vote (Guardian)

The main demand of this week's 'parliamentary revolt' was that Cyprus remain an offshore tax haven, writes Nikos Chrysoloras.

6. Osborne’s play for the strivers (Financial Times)

The chancellor had to revive his party’s winning tradition as the friend of the aspirational classes, writes Janan Ganesh.

7. This Budget was too hopeful. We want despair (Times)

The Chancellor calls Britain an ‘aspiration nation’, but we all know we’re in a mess, writes Matthew Parris. His best policy is to admit it.

8. George may seem unlovable but the smirking alternative would lead us to perdition (Daily Mail)

We must never forget that the only alternative government on offer will be led by Miliband and Balls, says Max Hastings.

9. Rights and wrongs of a Royal Charter (Independent)

An Independent editorial says that "with reluctance", the paper has accepted the use of a Royal Charter to create a new press regulator.

10. Good parenting can’t be measured in GDP (Daily Telegraph)

What does our Cabinet, mainly upper-class males, understand of real-world child care dilemmas, asks Allison Pearson. 

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Andy Burnham's full speech on attack: "Manchester is waking up to the most difficult of dawns"

"We are grieving today, but we are strong."

Following Monday night's terror attack on an Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena, newly elected mayor of the city Andy Burnham, gave a speech outside Manchester Town Hall on Tuesday morning, the full text of which is below: 

After our darkest of nights, Manchester is today waking up to the most difficult of dawns. 

It’s hard to believe what has happened here in the last few hours and to put into words the shock, anger and hurt that we feel today.

These were children, young people and their families that those responsible chose to terrorise and kill.

This was an evil act. Our first thoughts are with the families of those killed and injured. And we will do whatever we can to support them.

We are grieving today, but we are strong. Today it will be business as usual as far as possible in our great city.

I want to thank the hundreds of police, fire and ambulance staff who worked throughout the night in the most difficult circumstances imaginable.

We have had messages of support from cities around the country and across the world, and we want to thank them for that.

But lastly I wanted to thank the people of Manchester. Even in the minute after the attack, they opened their doors to strangers and drove them away from danger.

They gave the best possible immediate response to those who seek to divide us and it will be that spirit of Manchester that will prevail and hold us together.

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