Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. This budget is just as I feared (Guardian)

Only growth can save us from a lost decade, says Alistair Darling. But George Osborne is risking not just recession but depression.

2. Labour made the mess, but the Tories are only making it worse (Daily Telegraph)

The ugly truth is that there appears to be no political solution to the calamity facing us all, says Peter Oborne.

3. Shrewd politics hides brutal economics (Financial Times)

The Chancellor cannot disguise that economic outcomes are drifting further from expectations, writes Martin Wolf.

4. Trapped by his own ideology, the Chancellor is lonelier than ever (Independent)

Cabinet ministers are becoming more assertive, behind the scenes and publicly, writes Steve Richards.

5. Why we should be cautious about cheering on Cyprus's no vote (Guardian)

The main demand of this week's 'parliamentary revolt' was that Cyprus remain an offshore tax haven, writes Nikos Chrysoloras.

6. Osborne’s play for the strivers (Financial Times)

The chancellor had to revive his party’s winning tradition as the friend of the aspirational classes, writes Janan Ganesh.

7. This Budget was too hopeful. We want despair (Times)

The Chancellor calls Britain an ‘aspiration nation’, but we all know we’re in a mess, writes Matthew Parris. His best policy is to admit it.

8. George may seem unlovable but the smirking alternative would lead us to perdition (Daily Mail)

We must never forget that the only alternative government on offer will be led by Miliband and Balls, says Max Hastings.

9. Rights and wrongs of a Royal Charter (Independent)

An Independent editorial says that "with reluctance", the paper has accepted the use of a Royal Charter to create a new press regulator.

10. Good parenting can’t be measured in GDP (Daily Telegraph)

What does our Cabinet, mainly upper-class males, understand of real-world child care dilemmas, asks Allison Pearson. 

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What Jeremy Corbyn gets right about the single market

Technically, you can be outside the EU but inside the single market. Philosophically, you're still in the EU. 

I’ve been trying to work out what bothers me about the response to Jeremy Corbyn’s interview on the Andrew Marr programme.

What bothers me about Corbyn’s interview is obvious: the use of the phrase “wholesale importation” to describe people coming from Eastern Europe to the United Kingdom makes them sound like boxes of sugar rather than people. Adding to that, by suggesting that this “importation” had “destroy[ed] conditions”, rather than laying the blame on Britain’s under-enforced and under-regulated labour market, his words were more appropriate to a politician who believes that immigrants are objects to be scapegoated, not people to be served. (Though perhaps that is appropriate for the leader of the Labour Party if recent history is any guide.)

But I’m bothered, too, by the reaction to another part of his interview, in which the Labour leader said that Britain must leave the single market as it leaves the European Union. The response to this, which is technically correct, has been to attack Corbyn as Liechtenstein, Switzerland, Norway and Iceland are members of the single market but not the European Union.

In my view, leaving the single market will make Britain poorer in the short and long term, will immediately render much of Labour’s 2017 manifesto moot and will, in the long run, be a far bigger victory for right-wing politics than any mere election. Corbyn’s view, that the benefits of freeing a British government from the rules of the single market will outweigh the costs, doesn’t seem very likely to me. So why do I feel so uneasy about the claim that you can be a member of the single market and not the European Union?

I think it’s because the difficult truth is that these countries are, de facto, in the European Union in any meaningful sense. By any estimation, the three pillars of Britain’s “Out” vote were, firstly, control over Britain’s borders, aka the end of the free movement of people, secondly, more money for the public realm aka £350m a week for the NHS, and thirdly control over Britain’s own laws. It’s hard to see how, if the United Kingdom continues to be subject to the free movement of people, continues to pay large sums towards the European Union, and continues to have its laws set elsewhere, we have “honoured the referendum result”.

None of which changes my view that leaving the single market would be a catastrophe for the United Kingdom. But retaining Britain’s single market membership starts with making the argument for single market membership, not hiding behind rhetorical tricks about whether or not single market membership was on the ballot last June, when it quite clearly was. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.