Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The Cyprus eurozone bailout conditions are bank robbery pure and simple (Guardian)

This is yet another euro bailout that punishes ordinary people to prop up a bust financial system, writes Aditya Chakrabortty. How long can the euro last now?

2. Press battle thaws Labour-Lib Dem frost (Financial Times)

This could in future be seen as the dawn of a new coalition, writes Janan Ganesh.

3. Across the Rubicon (Times)

David Cameron’s Royal Charter subjects a free press to Parliament and sets a dangerous precedent, argues a Times leader.

4. A Leveson deal worth backing (Independent)

It is not credible to claim that the existing form of self-regulation was working, says an Independent editorial.

5. Politicians and press regulation: a good deal on paper … (Guardian)

The political class as a whole could discover that the brokering has only just begun, says a Guardian editorial.

6. Crosby’s cunning plan for a Tory victory – no more stupid ideas (Daily Telegraph)

There will be no more nods to fashion that leave voters on the right mystified or angry, says Benedict Brogan.

7. In the war on the poor, Pope Francis is on the wrong side (Guardian)

In Latin America a new Inquisition has betrayed Catholic priests who risk their lives to stand up to tyrants – as I've witnessed, writes George Monbiot. 

8. Europe’s leaders run out of credit in Cyprus (Financial Times)

The problem remains the gap in trust between north and south, says Gideon Rachman.

9. Will Britain's press repent its nasty ways? Don't hold your breath (Guardian)

A small triumph for citizens the royal charter may be, but for now we're still stuck with the most savage papers in Europe, says Polly Toynbee.

10. Forget privacy – it’s conversation Google is killing (Independent)

Google Glass will make its users even more detached from the immediate real world, writes Dominic Lawson. 

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.