Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Savers across Europe will look on in horror at the Troika's raid on Cyprus (Guardian)

It's now become clear: the threat to European savers and banks isn't anti-austerity parties but the Troika, writes Michael Burke.

2. Western meddling in Syria will only fuel the Sunni insurgency (Independent)

British efforts to arm 'moderate' rebels reveal a lack of understanding of this complex civil war, writes Patrick Cockburn.

3. Leveson vote: no cause for hyperventilating (Guardian)

There is much less at stake than anyone might guess from some of the discourse, says a Guardian editorial. Royal charter plus is a reasonable solution.

4. Only a gutter press can keep clean the gutters of public life (Daily Telegraph)

Legislation to control newspapers threatens our global reputation for honest dealing, says Boris Johnson.

5. Europe cannot allow unfinished business to fester (Financial Times)

In economic policy what is good for one is not good for all, says Lawrence Summers.

6. The Arab world must act – or face disaster (Times) (£)

Unless the Gulf states stump up their share of aid, the refugee problem will fuel extremism across the region, says Tim Montgomerie.

7. If MPs seize the presses it is you who will lose out (Sun)

We will suffer more bureaucracy and undiscovered corruption in public life without a free press, says Trevor Kavanagh. 

8. If Iraq taught us anything, it's this... (Independent)

Only when four vital tests have been met should we intervene in another state's affairs, but we can always help other than with arms, says Nick Clegg.

9. Is George 'too toxic' to survive the storm? (Daily Mail)

Senior Tories say Wednesday’s Budget is his last throw of the dice  as Chancellor, writes Peter McKay.

10. Dangers lurk in US permanent campaign (Financial Times)

The journey from idealist to insider is now complete, writes Edward Luce.

Grant Shapps on the campaign trail. Photo: Getty
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Grant Shapps resigns over Tory youth wing bullying scandal

The minister, formerly party chairman, has resigned over allegations of bullying and blackmail made against a Tory activist. 

Grant Shapps, who was a key figure in the Tory general election campaign, has resigned following allegations about a bullying scandal among Conservative activists.

Shapps was formerly party chairman, but was demoted to international development minister after May. His formal statement is expected shortly.

The resignation follows lurid claims about bullying and blackmail among Tory activists. One, Mark Clarke, has been accused of putting pressure on a fellow activist who complained about his behaviour to withdraw the allegation. The complainant, Elliot Johnson, later killed himself.

The junior Treasury minister Robert Halfon also revealed that he had an affair with a young activist after being warned that Clarke planned to blackmail him over the relationship. Former Tory chair Sayeedi Warsi says that she was targeted by Clarke on Twitter, where he tried to portray her as an anti-semite. 

Shapps appointed Mark Clarke to run RoadTrip 2015, where young Tory activists toured key marginals on a bus before the general election. 

Today, the Guardian published an emotional interview with the parents of 21-year-old Elliot Johnson, the activist who killed himself, in which they called for Shapps to consider his position. Ray Johnson also spoke to BBC's Newsnight:


The Johnson family claimed that Shapps and co-chair Andrew Feldman had failed to act on complaints made against Clarke. Feldman says he did not hear of the bullying claims until August. 

Asked about the case at a conference in Malta, David Cameron pointedly refused to offer Shapps his full backing, saying a statement would be released. “I think it is important that on the tragic case that took place that the coroner’s inquiry is allowed to proceed properly," he added. “I feel deeply for his parents, It is an appalling loss to suffer and that is why it is so important there is a proper coroner’s inquiry. In terms of what the Conservative party should do, there should be and there is a proper inquiry that asks all the questions as people come forward. That will take place. It is a tragic loss of a talented young life and it is not something any parent should go through and I feel for them deeply.” 

Mark Clarke denies any wrongdoing.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.