Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Savers across Europe will look on in horror at the Troika's raid on Cyprus (Guardian)

It's now become clear: the threat to European savers and banks isn't anti-austerity parties but the Troika, writes Michael Burke.

2. Western meddling in Syria will only fuel the Sunni insurgency (Independent)

British efforts to arm 'moderate' rebels reveal a lack of understanding of this complex civil war, writes Patrick Cockburn.

3. Leveson vote: no cause for hyperventilating (Guardian)

There is much less at stake than anyone might guess from some of the discourse, says a Guardian editorial. Royal charter plus is a reasonable solution.

4. Only a gutter press can keep clean the gutters of public life (Daily Telegraph)

Legislation to control newspapers threatens our global reputation for honest dealing, says Boris Johnson.

5. Europe cannot allow unfinished business to fester (Financial Times)

In economic policy what is good for one is not good for all, says Lawrence Summers.

6. The Arab world must act – or face disaster (Times) (£)

Unless the Gulf states stump up their share of aid, the refugee problem will fuel extremism across the region, says Tim Montgomerie.

7. If MPs seize the presses it is you who will lose out (Sun)

We will suffer more bureaucracy and undiscovered corruption in public life without a free press, says Trevor Kavanagh. 

8. If Iraq taught us anything, it's this... (Independent)

Only when four vital tests have been met should we intervene in another state's affairs, but we can always help other than with arms, says Nick Clegg.

9. Is George 'too toxic' to survive the storm? (Daily Mail)

Senior Tories say Wednesday’s Budget is his last throw of the dice  as Chancellor, writes Peter McKay.

10. Dangers lurk in US permanent campaign (Financial Times)

The journey from idealist to insider is now complete, writes Edward Luce.

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Why Ukip might not be dead just yet

Nigel Farage's party might have a second act in it. 

Remember Ukip? Their former leader Nigel Farage is carving out a living as a radio shock jock and part-time film critic. The party is currently midway through a leadership election to replace Paul Nuttall, who quit his post following their disastrous showing at the general election.

They are already facing increasing financial pressure thanks to the loss of short money and, now they no longer have any MPs, their parliamentary office in Westminster, too. There may be bigger blows to come. In March 2019, their 24 MEPs will all lose their posts when Britain leaves the European Union, denying another source of funding. In May 2021, if Ukip’s disastrous showing in the general election is echoed in the Welsh Assembly, the last significant group of full-time Ukip politicians will lose their seats.

To make matters worse, the party could be badly split if Anne-Marie Waters, the founder of Sharia Watch, is elected leader, as many of the party’s MEPs have vowed to quit if she wins or is appointed deputy leader by the expected winner, Peter Whittle.

Yet when you talk to Ukip officials or politicians, they aren’t despairing, yet. 

Because paradoxically, they agree with Remainers: Theresa May’s Brexit deal will disappoint. Any deal including a "divorce bill" – which any deal will include – will fall short of May's rhetoric at the start of negotiations. "People are willing to have a little turbulence," says one senior figure about any economic fallout, "but not if you tell them you haven't. We saw that with Brown and the end of boom and bust. That'll be where the government is in March 2019."

They believe if Ukip can survive as a going concern until March 2019, then they will be well-placed for a revival. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.