Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Savers across Europe will look on in horror at the Troika's raid on Cyprus (Guardian)

It's now become clear: the threat to European savers and banks isn't anti-austerity parties but the Troika, writes Michael Burke.

2. Western meddling in Syria will only fuel the Sunni insurgency (Independent)

British efforts to arm 'moderate' rebels reveal a lack of understanding of this complex civil war, writes Patrick Cockburn.

3. Leveson vote: no cause for hyperventilating (Guardian)

There is much less at stake than anyone might guess from some of the discourse, says a Guardian editorial. Royal charter plus is a reasonable solution.

4. Only a gutter press can keep clean the gutters of public life (Daily Telegraph)

Legislation to control newspapers threatens our global reputation for honest dealing, says Boris Johnson.

5. Europe cannot allow unfinished business to fester (Financial Times)

In economic policy what is good for one is not good for all, says Lawrence Summers.

6. The Arab world must act – or face disaster (Times) (£)

Unless the Gulf states stump up their share of aid, the refugee problem will fuel extremism across the region, says Tim Montgomerie.

7. If MPs seize the presses it is you who will lose out (Sun)

We will suffer more bureaucracy and undiscovered corruption in public life without a free press, says Trevor Kavanagh. 

8. If Iraq taught us anything, it's this... (Independent)

Only when four vital tests have been met should we intervene in another state's affairs, but we can always help other than with arms, says Nick Clegg.

9. Is George 'too toxic' to survive the storm? (Daily Mail)

Senior Tories say Wednesday’s Budget is his last throw of the dice  as Chancellor, writes Peter McKay.

10. Dangers lurk in US permanent campaign (Financial Times)

The journey from idealist to insider is now complete, writes Edward Luce.

Getty Images.
Show Hide image

PMQs review: Theresa May shows again that Brexit means hard Brexit

The Prime Minister's promise of "an end to free movement" is incompatible with single market membership. 

Theresa May, it is commonly said, has told us nothing about Brexit. At today's PMQs, Jeremy Corbyn ran with this line, demanding that May offer "some clarity". In response, as she has before, May stated what has become her defining aim: "an end to free movement". This vow makes a "hard Brexit" (or "chaotic Brexit" as Corbyn called it) all but inevitable. The EU regards the "four freedoms" (goods, capital, services and people) as indivisible and will not grant the UK an exemption. The risk of empowering eurosceptics elsewhere is too great. Only at the cost of leaving the single market will the UK regain control of immigration.

May sought to open up a dividing line by declaring that "the Labour Party wants to continue with free movement" (it has refused to rule out its continuation). "I want to deliver on the will of the British people, he is trying to frustrate the British people," she said. The problem is determining what the people's will is. Though polls show voters want control of free movement, they also show they want to maintain single market membership. It is not only Boris Johnson who is pro-having cake and pro-eating it. 

Corbyn later revealed that he had been "consulting the great philosophers" as to the meaning of Brexit (a possible explanation for the non-mention of Heathrow, Zac Goldsmith's resignation and May's Goldman Sachs speech). "All I can come up with is Baldrick, who says our cunning plan is to have no plan," he quipped. Without missing a beat, May replied: "I'm interested that [he] chose Baldrick, of course the actor playing Baldrick was a member of the Labour Party, as I recall." (Tony Robinson, a Corbyn critic ("crap leader"), later tweeted that he still is one). "We're going to deliver the best possible deal in goods and services and we're going to deliver an end to free movement," May continued. The problem for her is that the latter aim means that the "best possible deal" may be a long way from the best. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.