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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman

1. Now it’s a battle for the soul of David Cameron (Sunday Telegraph)

Forget the issue of who might make a plausible new leader for the Conservative Party - the question is, can the Prime Minister reinvent himself now that the modernisation project is dead, says Janet Daley.

2. Overburdened, overtaxed, over to you, George (Sunday Times) (£)

This week’s budget must remove the obstacles that prevent job creation, writes David Davis.

3. Secret courts: the Lords must prevent this perversion of true justice (Observer)

The justice and security bill, which would allow secret courts, is pernicious and has no place in this country, says this Observer editorial.

4. My Budget will be tough but it will help people who work hard (Sun on Sunday)

Ahead of delivering his Budget Chancellor George Osborne lays out three-point plan.

5. Britain has a responsibility to ensure tough standards are imposed on the sale of our weapons (Independent on Sunday)

The UN will soon meet to agree a global arms trade treaty and as events in Syria show, thousands of lives depend on on the outcome, write Douglas Alexander and Jim Murphy.

6. There's a fresh way on immigration – and it has the public's support (Observer)

A new survey points the way to a balanced and rational approach to immigration that could win widespread consent, writes Andrew Rawnsley.

7. Why this Budget really is the Chancellor's last chance... (Mail on Sunday)

Michael Ashcroft warns George Osborne that he MUST offer the voters more than just endless austerity.

8. Note to all Tories: calm down, dears (Sunday Telegraph)

The Conservatives need to realise they're on the right path, says Andrew Mitchell.

9. Leveson's liberal friends bring shame upon the left (Observer)

MPs who vote to regulate the press tomorrow are siding against the principles they're meant to uphold, says Nick Cohen.

10. Free speech is too important for all this messy politicking (Sunday Telegraph)

A national wave of revulsion at phone hacking is ending in compromise, brinkmanship and Hugh Grant finally getting to play the tough guy, says Matthew D'Ancona.