Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. MPs must not decide what goes in the papers (Times) (£)

The public mood is for a press law. But that mood will blow over and we will look foolish if we give into it, says Matthew Parris.

2. You're not a tourist, Obama. Go to Israel with a message (Guardian)

As Netanyahu unveils his new government, the US president should echo Israel's former security chiefs: the occupation must end, says Jonathan Freedland. 

3. Nigel Farage: beware Ukip's smiling assassin (Daily Telegraph)

The Ukip leader Nigel Farage his party of 'cranks and gadflies’ have become a clear and present danger to David Cameron and the Conservative Party, writes Judith Woods.

4. The Leveson dispute could destroy our free press (Independent)

One of the principles that made me want to be a journalist in the first place and to help produce a newspaper such as this one, is at stake, says Chris Blackhurst.

5. Osborne and Cameron must cut further (FT) (£)

The choice is pain now or prolonged agony later, writes Terry Leahy.

6. Royalists make the lives of the royal family a misery (Guardian)

The monarchy locks people in a gilded cage and denies them the most basic freedom of all – the freedom to be themselves, writes Deborah Orr.

7. Charities must clean up their act if they want us to dig deep (Daily Telegraph)

Surveys show that people will donate more when they understand the purpose of the donation, so maybe charities should stop trying to function as political groups, argues Graeme Archer.

8. How to protect individuals and press freedom (Times) (£)

Our Royal Charter-plus will ensure robust self-regulation while winning cross-party support, writes Nick Clegg.

9. David Cameron's court rounds on Theresa May (Daily Express)

Every prime minister has a court, rather in the style of a Tudor monarch, says Patrick O'Flynn.

10. The new Pope promises a new approach in the Catholic Church - but will this extend to Twitter? (Independent)

Perhaps it's time for @pontifex to loosen up and add Piers Morgan, says Simon Kelner.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.