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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Labour mustn't sign up to stagnation (Guardian)

We can steer Britain off the road to ruin – but emulating Tory austerity isn't the right way to do it, says Peter Hain.

2.  Don’t attack Britain’s oldies – they keep the economy going (Daily Telegraph)

The growing army of working over-65s dispels the idea that the elderly burden the young, says Fraser Nelson.

3. With this mess Labour should be miles ahead (Times)

The Chancellor should be toast – but the opposition would not be credible even if it repented of its spending sins, writes Philip Collins.

4. Parliament must support a free press (Daily Telegraph)

David Cameron's Royal Charter proposal is the best option for eradicating the kind of newspaper malpractice highlighted by the Leveson inquiry, argues a Telegraph editorial.

5. Leveson vote: some way from resolution (Guardian)

Politicians on all sides should look again to see if there isn't common ground, argues a Guardian editorial.

6. After hubris in Iraq, hesitation in Syria (Financial Times)

The tough lessons from an invasion a decade ago do not apply today, writes Philip Stephens.

7. A tawdry alliance and the threat to a free press (Daily Mail)

The most unedifying aspect of this sorry saga is the way the Labour Party has been hijacked by Hacked Off, says a Daily Mail editorial.

8. Bedroom tax: why you should march against this heartless, pointless 'reform' (Guardian)

Mass evictions of the most vulnerable are no way to tackle the housing benefit bill, and we must do all we can to stop them, writes Polly Toynbee.

9. As Obama flies in, this feels like a Berlin Wall moment for Israel (Independent)

There is now a majority here in favour of a two-state solution, writes Mary Dejevsky.

10. The British Budget is not as great as it was (Financial Times)

The chancellor’s showpiece had its heyday in the 1960s and has never regained its economic eminence, writes Samuel Brittan.