Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Conservatives will battle for Britain's future (Sunday Telegraph)

Rather than shifting left or shifting right, the Conservatives are positioning themselves in the "common ground" of British politics, says David Cameron.

2. The Tories should now know you don't beat Ukip by copying them (Observer)

Conservative MPs urging David Cameron to lurch right are drawing the wrong conclusion from Eastleigh, says Andrew Rawnsley.

3. Dave's rebels pull off their gloves - for the big Budget bust-up (Mail on Sunday)

David Cameron and George Osborne’s internal enemies are set to demand a change of economic direction, writes James Forsyth.

4. The PM can still win, but it might have to get personal (Sunday Telegraph)

People need to hear a narrative that makes sense of the pain, the change and the challenge – and they haven’t heard it yet, writes Matthew d'Ancona.

5. Ten years on, the case for invading Iraq is still valid (Observer)

A decade after Saddam Hussein was overthrown, why are some progressives still loath to celebrate his demise, asks Nick Cohen.

6. As ever, Tony Blair is David Cameron's guide (Independent on Sunday)

The credit-rating downgrade and Ukip's success in Eastleigh could have resulted in the PM changing course, writes John Rentoul. He has rightly not done so.

7. How shaming the poor became our new bloodsport (Observer)

Politicians have taken the lead in blaming poverty on the poor, writes Barbara Ellen.

8. At long last, a return to British justice (Mail on Sunday)

Theresa May's plan to pull out of the European Convention on Human Rights will ensure foreign criminals cannot be sheltered from justice, says a Mail on Sunday editorial.

9. UKIP’s purple patch is here to stay, PM (Sunday Times)

The potential is there for Farage and his followers to move from disruptive force to breakthrough, writes Adam Boulton.

10. Aid has transformed Africa. Now is the time for growth and governance (Observer)

Africa has made huge advances since the 2005 Glenagles summit – but it still needs our support, says Tony Blair.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

What will the 2017 local elections tell us about the general election?

In her timing of the election, Theresa May is taking a leaf out of Margaret Thatcher's book. 

Local elections are, on the whole, a much better guide to the next general election than anything the polls might do.

In 2012, Kevin Cunningham, then working in Labour’s targeting and analysis team, surprised his colleagues by announcing that they had lost the 2015 election. Despite gaining 823 councillors and taking control of 32 more local authorities, Cunningham explained to colleagues, they hadn’t made anything like the gains necessary for that point in the parliament. Labour duly went on to lose, in defiance of the polls, in 2015.

Matt Singh, the founder of NumberCruncherPolitics, famously called the polling failure wrong, in part because Labour under Ed Miliband had underperformed their supposed poll share in local elections and parliamentary by-elections throughout the parliament.

The pattern in parliamentary by-elections and local elections under Jeremy Corbyn before the European referendum all pointed the same way – a result that was not catastrophically but slightly worse than that secured by Ed Miliband in 2015. Since the referendum, thanks to the popularity of Theresa May, the Conservative poll lead has soared but more importantly, their performance in contests around the country has improved, too.

As regular readers will know, I was under the impression that Labour’s position in the polls had deteriorated during the coup against Corbyn, but much to my surprise, Labour’s vote share remained essentially stagnant during that period. The picture instead has been one of steady deterioration, which has accelerated since the calling of the snap election. So far, voters buy Theresa May’s message that a large majority will help her get a good Brexit deal. (Spoiler alert: it won’t.)

If the polls are correct, assuming a 2020 election, what we would expect at the local elections would be for Labour to lose around 100 councillors, largely to the benefit of the Liberal Democrats, and the Conservatives to pick up around 100 seats too, largely to the detriment of Ukip.

But having the local elections just five weeks before the general elections changes things. Basically, what tends to happen in local elections is that the governing party takes a kicking in off-years, when voters treat the contests as a chance to stick two fingers up to the boost. But they do better when local elections are held on the same day as the general election, as voters tend to vote for their preferred governing party and then vote the same way in the elections on the same day.

The Conservatives’ 2015 performance is a handy example of this. David Cameron’s Tories gained 541 councillors that night. In 2014, they lost 236, in 2013 they lost 335, and in 2012 they lost 405. In 2011, an usually good year for the governing party, they actually gained 86, an early warning sign that Miliband was not on course to win, but one obscured because of the massive losses the Liberal Democrats sustained in 2011.

The pattern holds true for Labour governments, too. In 2010, Labour gained 417 councillors, having lost 291 and 331 in Gordon Brown’s first two council elections at the helm. In 2005, with an electoral map which, like this year’s was largely unfavourable to Labour, Tony Blair’s party only lost 114 councillors, in contrast to the losses of 464 councillors (2004), 831 councillors (2003) and 334 councillors (2002).  This holds true all the way back to 1979, the earliest meaningful comparison point thanks to changes to local authorities’ sizes and electorates, where Labour (the governing party) gained council seats after years of losing them.

So here’s the question: what happens when local elections are held in the same year but not the same day as local elections? Do people treat them as an opportunity to kick the government? Or do they vote “down-ticket” as they do when they’re held on the same day?

Before looking at the figures, I expected that they would be inclined to give them a miss. But actually, only the whole, these tend to be higher turnout affairs. In 1983 and 1987, although a general election had not been yet called, speculation that Margaret Thatcher would do so soon was high. In 1987, Labour prepared advertisements and a slogan for a May election. In both contests, voters behaved much more like a general election, not a local election.

The pattern – much to my surprise – holds for 1992, too, when the Conservatives went to the country in April 1992, a month before local elections. The Conservatives gained 303 seats in May 1992.

What does this mean for the coming elections? Well, basically, a good rule of thumb for predicting general elections is to look at local election results, and assume that the government will do a bit better and the opposition parties will do significantly worse.

(To give you an idea: two years into the last parliament, Labour’s projected national vote share after the local elections was 38 per cent. They got 31 per cent. In 1985, Labour’s projected national vote share based on the local elections was 39 per cent, they got 30 per cent. In 2007, the Conservatives projected share of the vote was 40 per cent – they got 36 per cent, a smaller fall, but probably because by 2010 Gordon Brown was more unpopular even than Tony Blair had been by 2007.)

In this instance, however, the evidence suggests that the Tories will do only slightly better and Labour and the Liberal Democrats only slightly worse in June than their local election performances in May. Adjust your sense of  what “a good night” for the various parties is accordingly. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

0800 7318496