Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Conservatives will battle for Britain's future (Sunday Telegraph)

Rather than shifting left or shifting right, the Conservatives are positioning themselves in the "common ground" of British politics, says David Cameron.

2. The Tories should now know you don't beat Ukip by copying them (Observer)

Conservative MPs urging David Cameron to lurch right are drawing the wrong conclusion from Eastleigh, says Andrew Rawnsley.

3. Dave's rebels pull off their gloves - for the big Budget bust-up (Mail on Sunday)

David Cameron and George Osborne’s internal enemies are set to demand a change of economic direction, writes James Forsyth.

4. The PM can still win, but it might have to get personal (Sunday Telegraph)

People need to hear a narrative that makes sense of the pain, the change and the challenge – and they haven’t heard it yet, writes Matthew d'Ancona.

5. Ten years on, the case for invading Iraq is still valid (Observer)

A decade after Saddam Hussein was overthrown, why are some progressives still loath to celebrate his demise, asks Nick Cohen.

6. As ever, Tony Blair is David Cameron's guide (Independent on Sunday)

The credit-rating downgrade and Ukip's success in Eastleigh could have resulted in the PM changing course, writes John Rentoul. He has rightly not done so.

7. How shaming the poor became our new bloodsport (Observer)

Politicians have taken the lead in blaming poverty on the poor, writes Barbara Ellen.

8. At long last, a return to British justice (Mail on Sunday)

Theresa May's plan to pull out of the European Convention on Human Rights will ensure foreign criminals cannot be sheltered from justice, says a Mail on Sunday editorial.

9. UKIP’s purple patch is here to stay, PM (Sunday Times)

The potential is there for Farage and his followers to move from disruptive force to breakthrough, writes Adam Boulton.

10. Aid has transformed Africa. Now is the time for growth and governance (Observer)

Africa has made huge advances since the 2005 Glenagles summit – but it still needs our support, says Tony Blair.

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The Fire Brigades Union reaffiliates to Labour - what does it mean?

Any union rejoining Labour will be welcomed by most in the party - but the impact on the party's internal politics will be smaller than you think.

The Fire Brigades Union (FBU) has voted to reaffiliate to the Labour party, in what is seen as a boost to Jeremy Corbyn. What does it mean for Labour’s internal politics?

Firstly, technically, the FBU has never affliated before as they are notionally part of the civil service - however, following the firefighters' strike in 2004, they decisively broke with Labour.

The main impact will be felt on the floor of Labour party conference. Although the FBU’s membership – at around 38,000 – is too small to have a material effect on the outcome of votes themselves, it will change the tenor of the motions put before party conference.

The FBU’s leadership is not only to the left of most unions in the Trades Union Congress (TUC), it is more inclined to bring motions relating to foreign affairs than other unions with similar politics (it is more internationalist in focus than, say, the PCS, another union that may affiliate due to Corbyn’s leadership). Motions on Israel/Palestine, the nuclear deterrent, and other issues, will find more support from FBU delegates than it has from other affiliated trade unions.

In terms of the balance of power between the affiliated unions themselves, the FBU’s re-entry into Labour politics is unlikely to be much of a gamechanger. Trade union positions, elected by trade union delegates at conference, are unlikely to be moved leftwards by the reaffiliation of the FBU. Unite, the GMB, Unison and Usdaw are all large enough to all-but-guarantee themselves a seat around the NEC. Community, a small centrist union, has already lost its place on the NEC in favour of the bakers’ union, which is more aligned to Tom Watson than Jeremy Corbyn.

Matt Wrack, the FBU’s General Secretary, will be a genuine ally to Corbyn and John McDonnell. Len McCluskey and Dave Prentis were both bounced into endorsing Corbyn by their executives and did so less than wholeheartedly. Tim Roache, the newly-elected General Secretary of the GMB, has publicly supported Corbyn but is seen as a more moderate voice at the TUC. Only Dave Ward of the Communication Workers’ Union, who lent staff and resources to both Corbyn’s campaign team and to the parliamentary staff of Corbyn and McDonnell, is truly on side.

The impact of reaffiliation may be felt more keenly in local parties. The FBU’s membership looks small in real terms compared Unite and Unison have memberships of over a million, while the GMB and Usdaw are around the half-a-million mark, but is much more impressive when you consider that there are just 48,000 firefighters in Britain. This may make them more likely to participate in internal elections than other affiliated trade unionists, just 60,000 of whom voted in the Labour leadership election in 2015. However, it is worth noting that it is statistically unlikely most firefighters are Corbynites - those that are will mostly have already joined themselves. The affiliation, while a morale boost for many in the Labour party, is unlikely to prove as significant to the direction of the party as the outcome of Unison’s general secretary election or the struggle for power at the top of Unite in 2018. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.