Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The Pope can quit but it won't erase his complicity in his Church's crimes (Independent)

Letters from Cardinal Ratzinger have emerged in several US court cases, always protective of rapist priests, writes Geoffrey Robertson.

2. Jeremy Hunt's smoke and mirrors will not solve the care crisis (Guardian)

With no useful solution, the government should have left this snake's nest alone, says Polly Toynbee.

3. Horsemeat: Regulation doesn’t taste so bad now, does it? (Independent)

The question is no longer over the FSA’s existence but over whether it is powerful enough, writes Steve Richards.

4. Budget poker: Osborne needs a trump card (Times) (£)

There are rumblings of discontent from all sides as the Chancellor tries to improve on last year’s 'omnishambles', writes Rachel Sylvester.

5. A betrayal of Tory values that shatters the hopes of ordinary families (Daily Mail)

George Osborne had a dream of removing owners of family homes from inheritance tax, writes Stephen Glover. Now, in full possession of his faculties, he has decided to make them pay even more.

6. A rare sighting of good news in Europe (Financial Times)

The gloom that has haunted the region has lifted slightly, writes Gideon Rachman.

7. Why is it the state’s job to pay for our care? (Daily Telegraph)

There’s no 'scandal’ in selling a family home that has benefited from soaring house prices, says Philip Johnston.

8. Obama faces State of the Union test (Financial Times)

It is time for a serious overhaul of the US tax system, says an FT editorial.

9. Benedict, the placeholder pope who leaves a battered, weakened church (Guardian)

As John Paul II's right-hand man, he watched the papacy fall into decrepitude, writes Andrew Brown. He had no wish to follow suit.

10. Inheritance tax freeze proves Osborne is not a master strategist after all (Independent)

The Chancellor's 2007 pledge has been allowed to slip away with barely a murmur, notes an Independent editorial.

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Anatomy of a crisis: the facts on Europe’s refugees

What are the true figures on the crisis – and how many asylum seekers are countries taking?

How many refugees have countries offered resettlement to?

 

With 35,000 refugees offered resettlement, Germany is leading Europe in accepting displaced Syrians. Britain has so far taken in 187.

How many people are applying for asylum in the EU?

In the year ending June 2015, there have been 755,000 applications for asylum to the EU. In July, there were 37,531 to Germany alone.

How many asylum applications are there to the UK?

The UK ranks seventh in terms of the total number of asylum applications. 41% of applications recieve a positive decision.

How many refugees are being hosted by countries in the Middle East?

Turkey has taken in the most refugees, with 2,000,000 Syrians in the country.

How does the EU response to Syrian refugees compare to other nationalities of refugee?

This article first appeared in the 03 September 2015 issue of the New Statesman, Pope of the masses

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