Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. NHS enemies will declare the service broken. But it is not (Guardian)

Mid Staffs will be used to justify further reforms – and of the very kind that contributed to that horror in the first place, says Polly Toynbee.

2. Gove may have lost a skirmish, but he’s winning the war (Daily Telegraph)

The GCSE setback for Gove is proof that he is daring to try something new, says Fraser Nelson.

3. Leave things to the professionals, Mr Gove (Independent)

The Education Secretary almost managed to make his climbdown on the EBC look like part of a bigger masterplan, writes Melissa Benn. Almost, but not quite.

4. The NHS is run for the staff, not the patients (Times) (£)

It’s not heresy to demand that hospitals treat people like customers, says Philip Collins. More listening would have meant fewer deaths.

5. A case to reset basis of monetary policy (Financial Times)

The current regime is meant to stabilise inflation and help stabilise the economy, writes Martin Wolf. It has failed.

6. Tunisia is no longer a revolutionary poster-child (Guardian)

Tunisia's revolution was held up as a model, writes Rachel Shabi. But rising political violence is a real threat to progress.

7. Held back by the Lib Dems... yet again (Daily Mail)

By wrecking Michael Gove's GCSE plan, the Lib Dems have – once again – blocked a reform this country desperately needs if it is not to become an economic also-ran, says a Daily Mail editorial.

8. Intervention: the US won’t, Europe can’t (Financial Times)

Europeans have caught the bug just as the US has shaken it off – but they lack the means, writes Philip Stephens.

9. Bank of England: Mark Carney's circus (Guardian)

Carney's testimony to Treasury select committee made clear that a classic British evolution is the most that is likely to be on the cards, says a Guardian editorial.

The re-re-naming of Stalingrad and Spielberg's latest film Lincoln are both examples of how we revise our national history to suit the needs of the current times, writes Mary Dejevsky.

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Gerald Kaufman dies aged 86

Before becoming an MP, Kaufman's varied career included a stint as the NS' theatre critic.

Gerald Kaufman, the Labour MP for Manchester Gorton and former theatre critic at the New Statesman, has died.

Kaufman, who served as the MP for Manchester Gorton continuously from 1970, had a varied career before entering Parliament, working for the Fabian Society in addition to his flourishing career in journalism and as a satirist, writing for That Was The Week That Was and as a leader writer on the Mirror. In 1965, he exchanged the press for politics, working as a press officer and an aide to Harold Wilson before he was elected to parliament in 1970.

Upon Labour’s return to office in 1974, he served as a junior minister until the party’s defeat in 1979, and on the opposition frontbenches until 1992, reaching the position of shadow foreign secretary. In 1999, he was chair of the Man Booker Prize, which that year was won by JM Coetzee’s Disgrace.

His death opens up a by-election in Manchester Gorton, which Labour is expected to win. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.