Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Labour can turn NHS scandal into success (Daily Telegraph)

Ed Miliband’s response to the Francis report on the Mid Staffordshire scandal could be the first step towards a Labour victory in 2015, says Mary Riddell.

2. Same-sex marriage vote: on the wrong side of history (Guardian)

The passing of the bill in the Commons was the latest climax in a disintegrating crisis of Conservative party credibility, says a Guardian editorial.

3. Cameron has sown needless discord (Daily Telegraph)

With the vote on gay marriage, the Prime Minister bounced his party into a reform for which there was no popular pressure, argues a Telegraph leader.

4. Japan can put people before profits (Financial Times)

The key to a better-balanced economy is to take surplus profits away from a corporate oligopoly, writes Martin Wolf.

5. Trident is no longer key to Britain’s security (Daily Telegraph)

Like-for-like renewal of our nuclear deterrent is neither strategically sound nor economically viable, write Des Browne and Ian Kearns.

6. It’s human to dread change and fear loss (Times) (£)

Good conservatives understand the value of tradition, but know when to welcome gay marriage or shopping malls, writes Daniel Finkelstein. 

7. Tory metrosexuals won the gay marriage vote – but at what cost? (Guardian)

 I agree that gay marriage is right, says Simon Jenkins. But the true test of tolerance lies in its treatment of intolerance – and we failed that test.

8. The Bank of England's new Governor is about to face a grilling, but what will the markets make of him? (Independent)

Mark Carney is eager to look for new policies to promote growth, writes Hamish McRae. Whether he can succeed is another issue.

9. Britain is a proud monarchy, and as such it must treat its former sovereigns with the respect owed to the office they held (Daily Mail)

The government  should grasp this moment to light the imagination of the nation, by holding a state funeral for Richard III at Westminster Abbey, says Andrew Roberts.

10. Ageing taxpayers owe the iPod generation (Financial Times)

Tax reform is crucial for Britain’s youth, writes Nick Bosanquet.

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Theresa May is paying the price for mismanaging Boris Johnson

The Foreign Secretary's bruised ego may end up destroying Theresa May. 

And to think that Theresa May scheduled her big speech for this Friday to make sure that Conservative party conference wouldn’t be dominated by the matter of Brexit. Now, thanks to Boris Johnson, it won’t just be her conference, but Labour’s, which is overshadowed by Brexit in general and Tory in-fighting in particular. (One imagines that the Labour leadership will find a way to cope somehow.)

May is paying the price for mismanaging Johnson during her period of political hegemony after she became leader. After he was betrayed by Michael Gove and lacking any particular faction in the parliamentary party, she brought him back from the brink of political death by making him Foreign Secretary, but also used her strength and his weakness to shrink his empire.

The Foreign Office had its responsibility for negotiating Brexit hived off to the newly-created Department for Exiting the European Union (Dexeu) and for navigating post-Brexit trade deals to the Department of International Trade. Johnson was given control of one of the great offices of state, but with no responsibility at all for the greatest foreign policy challenge since the Second World War.

Adding to his discomfort, the new Foreign Secretary was regularly the subject of jokes from the Prime Minister and cabinet colleagues. May likened him to a dog that had to be put down. Philip Hammond quipped about him during his joke-fuelled 2017 Budget. All of which gave Johnson’s allies the impression that Johnson-hunting was a licensed sport as far as Downing Street was concerned. He was then shut out of the election campaign and has continued to be a marginalised figure even as the disappointing election result forced May to involve the wider cabinet in policymaking.

His sense of exclusion from the discussions around May’s Florence speech only added to his sense of isolation. May forgot that if you aren’t going to kill, don’t wound: now, thanks to her lost majority, she can’t afford to put any of the Brexiteers out in the cold, and Johnson is once again where he wants to be: centre-stage. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.