Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Could Chris Huhne take Nick Clegg or David Cameron with him? (Daily Telegraph)

The by-election in Eastleigh brought about by the Lib Dem's resignation will be fought viciously and will expose every rift in the coalition, writes Peter Oborne.

2. A crisis needs a firewall not a ringfence (Financial Times)

We cannot solve our banking problems until the eurozone does too, says Alistair Darling.

3. Gay marriage: no one can stop this social revolution now (Independent)

Some lives will be improved, a wider signal conveyed about tolerance, but the legalisation of gay marriage will have a negligible effect on the next election, says Steve Richards.

4. The shadow of 1914 falls over the Pacific (Financial Times)

China, like Germany 100 years ago, fears the established power is intent on blocking its ascent, writes Gideon Rachman. 

5. Voters won’t listen if the Tories talk only among themselves (Daily Telegraph)

The Mid-Staffs report demands a united front, but the party is rowing over gay marriage, writes Benedict Brogan.

6. The end of nuclear power? Careful what you wish for (Guardian)

Flawed and stalled as the plans for toxic waste may be, at least they exist, says George Monbiot. There is no way to clean up CO2, the greater evil.

7. There’s no such thing as an MP’s private life (Times) (£)

Chris Huhne’s fall was personal, not political, writes Rachel Sylvester. But in today’s Westminster pressure cooker that counts for nothing.

8. George Osborne: hedging his bets (Guardian)

The Chancellor wants to eat his cake and have it when it comes to banking reform, says a Guardian editorial. 

9. Gay marriage and a split no one wanted (Daily Mail)

In the depths of the worst economic crisis in living memory, the Prime Minister has pushed this fringe obsession to the top of his programme for government, says a Daily Mail editorial.

10. Israel, Palestine and the mapping of power (Guardian)

In portraying politics rather than geography, Ramallah and Jerusalem are displaying instincts as ancient as Ptolemy, writes Tristram Hunt. 

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#heterosexualprideday happened, and it’s rather depressing

It may have been a publicity stunt – but some of the responses are still worrying.

Waking up to the news Michael Gove would be running for the Tory premiership, I thought my daily share of bad news was out the way. Seeing "Heterosexual Pride Day" trending on Twitter made me think otherwise.

LGBT Pride Month in the United States is being celebrated throughout June, with many cities across the country celebrating pride events. Pride in London took place last weekend.

But the hashtag began in the US. This post, by @_JackNForTweets, appeared yesterday.

And despite the broad condemnation it elicited, some voiced their support of the hashtag.

The originator of the tweet later gloated about the furore it created.

Before firing off some more vitriol.

The timing, of course, is unsavoury. Not three weeks have passed since the deadly Orlando shooting – the worst in recent US history – in which 49 people were killed at an LGBT nightclub. In response to the attack, commemorative vigils were held around the world. 

Sensitivity to the specifically homophobic nature of the attack has been questioned within the media's coverage of the event. The day after the attack, Owen Jones walked out of Sky News interview.

Despite this, many have voiced their opposition to the hashtag.

Regardless of whether the hashtag was purely designed for clickbait, the more worrying thing is the traction of support it gained.