Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. David Cameron may live to regret his backing for George Osborne (Guardian)

By declaring his support until 2015, the PM has narrowed his options and risks energising his enemies within the party, writes Gaby Hinsliff. 

2. Obama must face the rise of the robots (Financial Times)

Technology will leave a large chunk of the US labour force in the lurch, says Edward Luce.

3. Cameron’s safe, but he urgently needs a plan (Times) (£)

Being a good front man is fine, but it’s not enough if the behind-the-scenes thinking simply isn’t going on, says Tim Montgomerie.

4. As the Tories revolt, Ed is given an easy ride (Daily Telegraph)

Labour’s poll lead belies a lack of convincing policies on the economy, Europe and much else, says Iain Martin.

5. Mid Staffs was a betrayal of the NHS (Guardian)

Transparency and accountability are the key to avoiding another care crisis, says Mike Farrar.

6. The bedroom tax is just the latest assault on our poorest citizens (Independent)

The government's approach requires it to demonise its victims as state dependent leeches, says Owen Jones.

7. Cameron’s critics should extol his European vision (Financial Times)

London needs to develop partners, issue by issue, writes Robert Zoellick.

8. Blair may be the one to save Dave (Sun)

The man David Cameron and George Osborne hail as "the master" has signalled that Labour is an empty vessel, writes Trevor Kavanagh. 

9. From the Papal monasteries to Timbuktu, absolutism lives on (Independent)

For the Salafists, a Muslim shrine is a rival to God as surely as Henry VIII saw the monasteries as a Papal rival, writes Robert Fisk. 

10. Mr Cameron needs a more civil partnership (Daily Telegraph)

The row over same-sex marriage makes the Conservatives look like an ill-disciplined rabble rather than a serious party of government, says a Telegraph editorial.

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Former Labour leader Ed Miliband tells Jeremy Corbyn: "I would have gone"

Jeremy Corbyn's predecessor broke his long silence to say the leader's position was "untenable". 

The former Labour leader Ed Miliband has swung his weight behind the campaign to oust Jeremy Corbyn after describing his position as "untenable" and declared he would have resigned already.

His intervention is seen as significant, because since losing the general election in 2015, Miliband has taken a step back and refused to publicly criticise his successor. 

But the day after Labour MPs voted they had no confidence in Corbyn, the former leader has finally spoken. 

Miliband told BBC Radio 4's World at One that his position was "untenable". 

He said:

"We are at a time of acute national crisis, a crisis I haven't known in my political lifetime, probably the biggest crisis for the country since World War II.

"At that moment we in the Labour party need to think about the country.

"I've supported Jeremy Corbyn all the way along from the moment he was elected because I thought it was absolutely the right thing to do. A lot of what he stands for is very important. But I've relcutantly reached the conclusion that his position is untenable."

 

But with Corbyn already defying the opinion of most of his parliamentary colleagues, this alone is unlikely to have much effect. It's what Miliband says next that is crucial.

Corbyn has argued the vote of no confidence against him was unconstitutional. Miliband thinks otherwise. He said: "You are the leader of the Labour Party, the leader of the party in parliament and the leader of the party in the country. Some people are saying this is unconstitional. In our constitution it says if a fifth of MPs support another candidate there is another contest."

And he implied it should not even get to a leadership contest: "No doubt that will follow if Corbyn decides to stay. but the question then for him is what is the right thing for the country and the party and the causes he stands for."

Miliband also hit out at accusations of a conspiracy to oust Corbyn:

"I've never been called a Blairite. I'm not a plotter. I'm somone who cares deeply anpout this country, deeply about my party, deeply about the causes I think Jeremy and I care about. I think the best thing on all of those criteria is that he stands down."

Asked what he would have done in the same situation, he replied: "I would have gone.

"One of the reasons I'm speaking out is because of what people are saying about this proceess. If you look at the people saying Jeremy should go, it's not people on one wing of the Labour Party.

"I had my troubles with certain people in the Labour Party. Some of them ideological, some on other issues, but this is not ideological." Some of Corbyn's ideas could continue under a new leader, he suggested. 

Miliband shared his views just minutes after his former rival, the Prime Minister David Cameron, told Corbyn it was not in the national interest for him to remain as leader. "I would say, for heaven's sake man, go," he told the Opposition leader at Prime Minister's Questions. 

Although the Brexit vote was a devastating blow for the PM, the aftermath has unleashed equal waves of turmoil for the Labour Party.

Corbyn's refusal to resign sparked a series of resignations from the shadow cabinet. Unmoved, he replaced them. Meanwhile Momentum, Corbyn's grassroots political organisation, held a rally in support outside Parliament. 

On Tuesday, Labour MPs voted 172 to 40 in favour of a no confidence motion, which paves the way for a leadership challenge.

But Corbyn described the vote as unconstitutional and pledged he "would not betray" the Labour Pary members, who gave him a sweeping mandate in 2015.