Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Even if Iran gets the bomb, it won’t be worth going to war (Daily Telegraph)

Containment is a better response than conflict in dealing with a country we have long mishandled, argues Jack Straw.

2. Voters expect Osborne to stay his course (Financial Times)

The British are busy hunkering down for years of squeezed living standards, writes Janan Ganesh.

3. The Lord Rennard scandal marks the moment the Lib Dems discovered they are on the big stage (Independent)

Clegg would not for a second be indifferent to precise allegations, but the response to this media frenzy does expose his party's inexperience, says Steve Richards.

4. Will EDF become the Barbra Streisand of climate protest? (Guardian)

The energy giant is part of a global strategy by corporations to stifle democracy, writes George Monbiot. Clearly it hasn't heard of the Streisand effect

5. The Lib Dems’ problem isn’t sex. It’s power (Times) (£)

Senior figures joined the party never expecting to be in the spotlight, writes Rachel Sylvester. Now it’s revealing political and personal flaws.

6. What Kerry needs to know about Iran (Financial Times)

Tehran is willing to enter into talks with the US, says Hossein Mousavian.

7. In Eastleigh, it's the worst kind of Westminster charade (Guardian)

While austerity rages on, the town's already disillusioned voters are being offered merely sordid spectacle, says Polly Toynbee.

8. A cap on bankers’ bonuses would be lunacy (Daily Telegraph)

If Europe does insist on bringing in legislation, it will make Britain’s EU exit even more likely, says Norman Lamont.

9. Downgrade exposes the myth about cuts (Daily Mail)

George Osborne must stop talking about cutting spending and actually do it, says a Daily Mail editorial. 

10. Why is free admission to art galleries and museums sacrosanct, when free swimming is not? (Independent)

Even in a time of straitened national finances, it never pays to underestimate the awesome power of the arts lobby in Britain, writes Dominic Lawson.

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Is anyone prepared to solve the NHS funding crisis?

As long as the political taboo on raising taxes endures, the service will be in financial peril. 

It has long been clear that the NHS is in financial ill-health. But today's figures, conveniently delayed until after the Conservative conference, are still stunningly bad. The service ran a deficit of £930m between April and June (greater than the £820m recorded for the whole of the 2014/15 financial year) and is on course for a shortfall of at least £2bn this year - its worst position for a generation. 

Though often described as having been shielded from austerity, owing to its ring-fenced budget, the NHS is enduring the toughest spending settlement in its history. Since 1950, health spending has grown at an average annual rate of 4 per cent, but over the last parliament it rose by just 0.5 per cent. An ageing population, rising treatment costs and the social care crisis all mean that the NHS has to run merely to stand still. The Tories have pledged to provide £10bn more for the service but this still leaves £20bn of efficiency savings required. 

Speculation is now turning to whether George Osborne will provide an emergency injection of funds in the Autumn Statement on 25 November. But the long-term question is whether anyone is prepared to offer a sustainable solution to the crisis. Health experts argue that only a rise in general taxation (income tax, VAT, national insurance), patient charges or a hypothecated "health tax" will secure the future of a universal, high-quality service. But the political taboo against increasing taxes on all but the richest means no politician has ventured into this territory. Shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander has today called for the government to "find money urgently to get through the coming winter months". But the bigger question is whether, under Jeremy Corbyn, Labour is prepared to go beyond sticking-plaster solutions. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.