Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. David Cameron may live to regret his backing for George Osborne (Guardian)

By declaring his support until 2015, the PM has narrowed his options and risks energising his enemies within the party, writes Gaby Hinsliff. 

2. Obama must face the rise of the robots (Financial Times)

Technology will leave a large chunk of the US labour force in the lurch, says Edward Luce.

3. Cameron’s safe, but he urgently needs a plan (Times) (£)

Being a good front man is fine, but it’s not enough if the behind-the-scenes thinking simply isn’t going on, says Tim Montgomerie.

4. As the Tories revolt, Ed is given an easy ride (Daily Telegraph)

Labour’s poll lead belies a lack of convincing policies on the economy, Europe and much else, says Iain Martin.

5. Mid Staffs was a betrayal of the NHS (Guardian)

Transparency and accountability are the key to avoiding another care crisis, says Mike Farrar.

6. The bedroom tax is just the latest assault on our poorest citizens (Independent)

The government's approach requires it to demonise its victims as state dependent leeches, says Owen Jones.

7. Cameron’s critics should extol his European vision (Financial Times)

London needs to develop partners, issue by issue, writes Robert Zoellick.

8. Blair may be the one to save Dave (Sun)

The man David Cameron and George Osborne hail as "the master" has signalled that Labour is an empty vessel, writes Trevor Kavanagh. 

9. From the Papal monasteries to Timbuktu, absolutism lives on (Independent)

For the Salafists, a Muslim shrine is a rival to God as surely as Henry VIII saw the monasteries as a Papal rival, writes Robert Fisk. 

10. Mr Cameron needs a more civil partnership (Daily Telegraph)

The row over same-sex marriage makes the Conservatives look like an ill-disciplined rabble rather than a serious party of government, says a Telegraph editorial.

Getty Images.
Show Hide image

PMQs review: Jeremy Corbyn turns "the nasty party" back on Theresa May

The Labour leader exploited Conservative splits over disability benefits.

It didn't take long for Theresa May to herald the Conservatives' Copeland by-election victory at PMQs (and one couldn't blame her). But Jeremy Corbyn swiftly brought her down to earth. The Labour leader denounced the government for "sneaking out" its decision to overrule a court judgement calling for Personal Independence Payments (PIPs) to be extended to those with severe mental health problems.

Rather than merely expressing his own outrage, Corbyn drew on that of others. He smartly quoted Tory backbencher Heidi Allen, one of the tax credit rebels, who has called on May to "think agan" and "honour" the court's rulings. The Prime Minister protested that the government was merely returning PIPs to their "original intention" and was already spending more than ever on those with mental health conditions. But Corbyn had more ammunition, denouncing Conservative policy chair George Freeman for his suggestion that those "taking pills" for anxiety aren't "really disabled". After May branded Labour "the nasty party" in her conference speech, Corbyn suggested that the Tories were once again worthy of her epithet.

May emphasised that Freeman had apologised and, as so often, warned that the "extra support" promised by Labour would be impossible without the "strong economy" guaranteed by the Conservatives. "The one thing we know about Labour is that they would bankrupt Britain," she declared. Unlike on previous occasions, Corbyn had a ready riposte, reminding the Tories that they had increased the national debt by more than every previous Labour government.

But May saved her jibe of choice for the end, recalling shadow cabinet minister Cat Smith's assertion that the Copeland result was an "incredible achivement" for her party. "I think that word actually sums up the Right Honourable Gentleman's leadership. In-cred-ible," May concluded, with a rather surreal Thatcher-esque flourish.

Yet many economists and EU experts say the same of her Brexit plan. Having repeatedly hailed the UK's "strong economy" (which has so far proved resilient), May had better hope that single market withdrawal does not wreck it. But on Brexit, as on disability benefits, it is Conservative rebels, not Corbyn, who will determine her fate.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.