Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. What Nick Clegg doesn't know can still get him into trouble (Guardian)

The Lib Dems' handling of harassment claims has so far been shameful, says Gaby Hinsliff. Their inquiries had best follow their brief – and dig.

2. The Chancellor’s not for turning – or sacking (Times) (£)

The Moody’s downgrading ought to shame our entire political class, who have blocked George Osborne’s plans, says Tim Montgomerie.

3. As Tory austerity inflicts misery on millions, Labour should articulate their alternative to Osbornomics (Independent)

Osborne’s failure must not lead to yet another bout of austerity under Labour, writes Owen Jones.

4. One thing’s clear about Eastleigh: it’ll be a wretched day for Labour (Daily Telegraph)

The magnificent Maria may see off the yellow peril, but Miliband’s man is already down and out, writes Boris Johnson.

5. Sexual claims: institutional failings (Guardian)

Uncertainty about how to proceed after serious allegations are made seems a disturbingly common institutional response, notes a Guardian editorial.

6. Hoist by his own petard... but this is no disaster (Daily Mail)

What sets the UK apart is that we have never, in our entire history, failed to pay back our debt, writes Alex Brummer.

7. Coalition facing a beastly Eastleigh (Sun)

Defeat for either the Lib Dems or the Tories will raise the odds on a coalition split sooner rather than later, says Trevor Kavanagh. 

8. How David Cameron can get more women into politics (Guardian)

 If he wants more female MPs, the prime minister must look at introducing job sharing to help them juggle family and career, says Sarah Wollaston. 

9.. The cyber age demands new rules of war (Financial Times)

A system to check covert violence is needed, writes Zbigniew Brzezinski.

10. How did modern Islam become so intolerant? (Independent)

No injustice can excuse or explain the rise of brutal Islamists, says Yasmin Alibhai Brown.

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Italian PM Matteo Renzi resigns after referendum No vote

Europe's right-wing populists cheered the result. 

Italy's centrist Prime Minister Matteo Renzi was forced to resign late on Sunday after he lost a referendum on constitutional change.

With most ballots counted, 60 per cent of Italians voted No to change, according to the BBC. The turn out was nearly 70 per cent. 

Voters were asked whether they backed a reform to Italy's complex political system, but right-wing populists have interpreted the referendum as a wider poll on the direction of the country.

Before the result, former Ukip leader Nigel Farage tweeted: "Hope the exit polls in Italy are right. This vote looks to me to be more about the Euro than constitutional change."

The leader of France's far-right Front National, Marine Le Pen, tweeted "bravo" to her Eurosceptic "friend" Matteo Salvini, a politician who campaigned for the No vote. She described the referendum result as a "thirst for liberty". 

In his resignation speech, Renzi told reporters he took responsibility for the outcome and added "good luck to us all". 

Since gaining office in 2014, Renzi has been a reformist politician. He introduced same-sex civil unions, made employment laws more flexible and abolished small taxes, and was known by some as "Europe's last Blairite".

However, his proposed constitutional reforms divided opinion even among liberals, because of the way they removed certain checks and balances and handed increased power to the government.

 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.