Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. What Nick Clegg doesn't know can still get him into trouble (Guardian)

The Lib Dems' handling of harassment claims has so far been shameful, says Gaby Hinsliff. Their inquiries had best follow their brief – and dig.

2. The Chancellor’s not for turning – or sacking (Times) (£)

The Moody’s downgrading ought to shame our entire political class, who have blocked George Osborne’s plans, says Tim Montgomerie.

3. As Tory austerity inflicts misery on millions, Labour should articulate their alternative to Osbornomics (Independent)

Osborne’s failure must not lead to yet another bout of austerity under Labour, writes Owen Jones.

4. One thing’s clear about Eastleigh: it’ll be a wretched day for Labour (Daily Telegraph)

The magnificent Maria may see off the yellow peril, but Miliband’s man is already down and out, writes Boris Johnson.

5. Sexual claims: institutional failings (Guardian)

Uncertainty about how to proceed after serious allegations are made seems a disturbingly common institutional response, notes a Guardian editorial.

6. Hoist by his own petard... but this is no disaster (Daily Mail)

What sets the UK apart is that we have never, in our entire history, failed to pay back our debt, writes Alex Brummer.

7. Coalition facing a beastly Eastleigh (Sun)

Defeat for either the Lib Dems or the Tories will raise the odds on a coalition split sooner rather than later, says Trevor Kavanagh. 

8. How David Cameron can get more women into politics (Guardian)

 If he wants more female MPs, the prime minister must look at introducing job sharing to help them juggle family and career, says Sarah Wollaston. 

9.. The cyber age demands new rules of war (Financial Times)

A system to check covert violence is needed, writes Zbigniew Brzezinski.

10. How did modern Islam become so intolerant? (Independent)

No injustice can excuse or explain the rise of brutal Islamists, says Yasmin Alibhai Brown.

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Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"