Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. George Osborne should stick to his job and leave politicking to others (Daily Telegraph)

The Chancellor has enough to do trying to save the economy from impending disaster, says Peter Oborne.

2. The lesson from Eastleigh is simple: the Conservative leadership has lost control of the party (Independent)

A new assertiveness at local level is changing the dynamics of Westminster, writes Steve Richards.

3. Now we know why it was right to invade Iraq (Times)

Ten years after the war began, the country is more secure and democratic, argues David Aaronovitch. The alternative was Syria on steroids.

4. Should one man take the blame for Mid Staffs? (Daily Telegraph)

Calls for the resignation of Sir David Nicholson, the NHS boss, raise profound questions about how we are governed, writes Sue Cameron.

5. Creationist free schools are an abuse - ancient ignorance has no place in education (Independent)

Young minds are primed by nature to believe most of what adults tell them to believe, writes A. C. Grayling. They should be treated with respect, not twisted into shapes that conform with dogma.

6. Europe takes its bite from the City (Financial Times)

Business may switch to New York or Hong Kong to evade EU rules, writes John Gapper.

7. I wish more of us shared the PM's pride in Empire (Daily Mail)

We have turned from being an optimistic, dynamic, outward-looking country to a narrow, introspective and unconfident one, says Stephen Glover.

8. Heroin chic's gone, but the curse of the catwalk remains (Guardian)

Size zero may have made way for 'space farmers' at London Fashion Week, yet the exploitation of vulnerable girls continues, writes Zoe Williams.

9. UK energy policy restricts growth (Financial Times)

Britain needs to get capital flowing into power, says Richard Lambert.

10. Europe: the Right Italy (Guardian)

At one end of the continent Italy is playing with fire, at the other, Britain is doing the same, says a Guardian editorial. 

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Will Jeremy Corbyn stand down if Labour loses the general election?

Defeat at the polls might not be the end of Corbyn’s leadership.

The latest polls suggest that Labour is headed for heavy defeat in the June general election. Usually a general election loss would be the trigger for a leader to quit: Michael Foot, Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband all stood down after their first defeat, although Neil Kinnock saw out two losses before resigning in 1992.

It’s possible, if unlikely, that Corbyn could become prime minister. If that prospect doesn’t materialise, however, the question is: will Corbyn follow the majority of his predecessors and resign, or will he hang on in office?

Will Corbyn stand down? The rules

There is no formal process for the parliamentary Labour party to oust its leader, as it discovered in the 2016 leadership challenge. Even after a majority of his MPs had voted no confidence in him, Corbyn stayed on, ultimately winning his second leadership contest after it was decided that the current leader should be automatically included on the ballot.

This year’s conference will vote on to reform the leadership selection process that would make it easier for a left-wing candidate to get on the ballot (nicknamed the “McDonnell amendment” by centrists): Corbyn could be waiting for this motion to pass before he resigns.

Will Corbyn stand down? The membership

Corbyn’s support in the membership is still strong. Without an equally compelling candidate to put before the party, Corbyn’s opponents in the PLP are unlikely to initiate another leadership battle they’re likely to lose.

That said, a general election loss could change that. Polling from March suggests that half of Labour members wanted Corbyn to stand down either immediately or before the general election.

Will Corbyn stand down? The rumours

Sources close to Corbyn have said that he might not stand down, even if he leads Labour to a crushing defeat this June. They mention Kinnock’s survival after the 1987 general election as a precedent (although at the 1987 election, Labour did gain seats).

Will Corbyn stand down? The verdict

Given his struggles to manage his own MPs and the example of other leaders, it would be remarkable if Corbyn did not stand down should Labour lose the general election. However, staying on after a vote of no-confidence in 2016 was also remarkable, and the mooted changes to the leadership election process give him a reason to hold on until September in order to secure a left-wing succession.

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