Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. So you think you know why Blair went to war? (Independent)

Being seen as Bush’s poodle was much safer than being accused of anti-Americanism, writes Steve Richards.

2. Ed Miliband needs to strike home on the mansion tax (Daily Mirror)

The red dividing lines of the 2015 general election are being drawn and the Tories are positioning themselves as defenders of privilege, says Kevin Maguire.

3. Disarmed Europe will face the world alone (Financial Times)

One day Europeans may find that the US military is not there to deal with threats lapping at their frontiers, writes Gideon Rachman.

4. How to turn a housing crisis into a homeless catastrophe (Guardian)

From Westminster to Hull, the bedroom tax is proving to be the ultra-sharp end of three decades of failure to build, says Polly Toynbee.

5. Never mind the rich and poor, what about the middle classes? (Daily Telegraph)

In America, the middle classes are the most courted group in politics, writes Benedict Brogan. But here they have been erased from the debate.

6. Legalising drugs would be the perfect Tory policy (Guardian)

It would save money, aid global security and be tough on crime, writes Ian Birrell. What could appeal to Conservatives more?

7. Supply matters – but so does demand (Financial Times)

The UK needs more innovation, infrastructure and skills, write Robert Skidelsky and Marcus Miller.

8. Manic activity makes for bad government (Daily Telegraph)

David Cameron and the Conservatives should embrace 'masterly inactivity’ – it often yields better results, says George Bridges.

9. A Slippery Slope (Times)

A political bidding war over the mansion tax will inevitably end in higher property charges for the middle classes, says a Times editorial.

10. David Cameron should beware this war on ‘soft’ judges (Independent)

The Prime Minister must be watching Theresa May's manoeuvres with mixed feelings, says an Independent editorial.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.