Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The left should learn about plain speaking from George Galloway (Independent)

The right is better at communicating because it uses stories so much, writes Owen Jones.

2. All good Tories should support a mansion tax (Times) 

The job of a pro-free market party should not be unquestioningly to defend the interests of the super-rich, says Tim Montgomerie.

3. Why the free market fundamentalists think 2013 will be the best year ever (Guardian)

As communists once did, today's capitalists blame any failures on their system being 'impurely' applied, writes Slavoj Žižek.

4. Obama is right to resist the Syria hawks (Financial Times)

The president’s lack of diplomatic creativity, rather than his sense of caution, is his real Achilles heel, says Edward Luce.

5. We shouted loudest over Sri Lanka’s abuses. Three years on and we’re arming the regime (Independent)

No matter how much red tape we put in place, we have no control over how such weaponry is used, writes Jerome Taylor.

6. Politicians and income tax: 10p or not 10p - that is the irrelevant question (Guardian)

Politicians of all parties often claim income tax cuts are the solution to many problems, but true progressives need to be much smarter, says a Guardian editorial.

7. Europe’s budget deal is flawed (Financial Times)

I cannot and will not accept what amount to unbalanced budgets, writes the president of the EU parliament, Martin Schulz.

8. I'd be overjoyed if this was the end of the foreign criminals fiasco- but don't hold your breath (Daily Mail)

Theresa May is just tinkering with the detail of human rights law, says Melanie Phillips. 

9. Labour shows its true colours with this spiteful tax on homes (Daily Telegraph)

If the two Eds get their way, an Englishman’s home will not be a castle, but a leaky ruin, says Boris Johnson.

The Tories aren't meant to be the nice party, they are meant to be the competent party, writes Geoffrey Wheatcroft.

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Jeremy Corbyn fans are getting extremely angry at the wrong Michael Foster

He didn't try to block the Labour leader off a ballot. He's just against hunting with dogs. 

Michael Foster was a Labour MP for Worcester from 1997 to 2010, where he was best known for trying to ban hunting with dogs. After losing his seat to Tory Robin Walker, he settled back into private life.

He quietly worked for a charity, and then a trade association. That is, until his doppelganger tried to get Jeremy Corbyn struck off the ballot paper. 

The Labour donor Michael Foster challenged Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Corbyn automatically run for leadership in court. He lost his bid, and Corbyn supporters celebrated.

And some of the most jubilant decided to tell Foster where to go. 

Foster told The Staggers he had received aggressive tweets: "I have had my photograph in the online edition of The Sun with the story. I had to ring them up and suggest they take it down. It is quite a common name."

Indeed, Michael Foster is such a common name that there were two Labour MPs with that name between 1997 and 2010. The other was Michael Jabez Foster, MP for Hastings and Rye. 

One senior Labour MP rang the Worcester Michael Foster up this week, believing he was the donor. 

Foster explained: "When I said I wasn't him, then he began to talk about the time he spent in Hastings with me which was the other Michael Foster."

Having two Michael Fosters in Parliament at the same time (the donor Michael Foster was never an MP) could sometimes prove useful. 

Foster said: "When I took the bill forward to ban hunting, he used to get quite a few of my death threats.

"Once I paid his pension - it came out of my salary."

Foster has never met the donor Michael Foster. An Owen Smith supporter, he admits "part of me" would have been pleased if he had managed to block Corbyn from the ballot paper, but believes it could have caused problems down the line.

He does however have a warning for Corbyn supporters: "If Jeremy wins, a place like Worcester will never have a Labour MP.

"I say that having years of working in the constituency. And Worcester has to be won by Labour as part of that tranche of seats to enable it to form a government."