Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Ed Miliband's 10p tax pledge is smart politics but dumb policy (Observer)

Andrew Rawnsely is unimpressed by the Labour leader's latest gambit...

2. Gordon Brown is dead, long live Gordon Brown (Sunday Times)

.... while Rafael Behr spots a familiar style in the way Ed Miliband plays his politics ...

3. Ed Miliband, the candidate from Planet Zog (Independent on Sunday)

... as does John Rentoul, who thinks the Labour leader lacks dexterity.

4. The meat scandal shows all that is rotten about our free marketeers (Observer)

Will Hutton finds the Conservative party ideologically ill-equipped to deal with another crisis in capitalism.

5. The Red Tops have a repellent new invention - murder trial porn (Independent on Sunday)

Joan Smith takes tabloids to task for demeaning the victims of terrible violent crimes.

6. Welsh Minister baffles himself on gay marriage (Observer)

Barbara Ellen finds David Jones's comments garbled and contradictory.

7. Why I am committed to global tax reform (Observer)

Op-ed, in which George Osborne pledges action on tax avoidance.

8. A drama that beats any Dan Brown plot (Sunday Telegraph)

Peter Stanford picks up some conspiracy theories around Pope Benedict's resignation.

9. Have the lessons of Iraq really been learnt (Independent on Sunday)

Former Liberal Democrat leader Sir Menzies Cambell is disappointed and cross.

10. If the tax rate does fall to 10p it will be because of America (Mail on Sunday)

James Forsyth identifies trans-Atlantic inspiration in Labour policy-making.

 

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Gordon Brown contemplated making Alastair Campbell a minister

The move is revealed in Ed Balls' new book.

Gordon Brown contemplated making Alastair Campbell, a sports minister. Campbell had served as Tony Blair’s press chief from 1994 to 2003, Ed Balls has revealed.

Although the move fell through, Campbell would have been one of a number of high-profile ministerial appointments, usually through the Lords, made by Brown during his tenure at 10 Downing Street.

Other unusual appointments included the so-called “Goats” appointed in 2007, part of what Brown dubbed “the government of all the talents”, in which Ara Darzi, a respected surgeon, Mark Malloch-Brown, formerly a United Nations diplomat,  Alan West, a former admiral, Paul Myners, a  successful businessman, and Digby Jones, former director-general of the CBI, took ministerial posts and seats in the Lords. While Darzi, West and Myners were seen as successes on Whitehall, Jones quit the government after a year and became a vocal critic of both Brown’s successors as Labour leader, Ed Miliband and Jeremy Corbyn.

The story is revealed in Ed Balls’ new book, Speaking Out, a record of his time as a backroom adviser and later Cabinet and shadow cabinet minister until the loss of his seat in May 2015. It is published 6 September.