Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Ed Miliband's 10p tax pledge is smart politics but dumb policy (Observer)

Andrew Rawnsely is unimpressed by the Labour leader's latest gambit...

2. Gordon Brown is dead, long live Gordon Brown (Sunday Times)

.... while Rafael Behr spots a familiar style in the way Ed Miliband plays his politics ...

3. Ed Miliband, the candidate from Planet Zog (Independent on Sunday)

... as does John Rentoul, who thinks the Labour leader lacks dexterity.

4. The meat scandal shows all that is rotten about our free marketeers (Observer)

Will Hutton finds the Conservative party ideologically ill-equipped to deal with another crisis in capitalism.

5. The Red Tops have a repellent new invention - murder trial porn (Independent on Sunday)

Joan Smith takes tabloids to task for demeaning the victims of terrible violent crimes.

6. Welsh Minister baffles himself on gay marriage (Observer)

Barbara Ellen finds David Jones's comments garbled and contradictory.

7. Why I am committed to global tax reform (Observer)

Op-ed, in which George Osborne pledges action on tax avoidance.

8. A drama that beats any Dan Brown plot (Sunday Telegraph)

Peter Stanford picks up some conspiracy theories around Pope Benedict's resignation.

9. Have the lessons of Iraq really been learnt (Independent on Sunday)

Former Liberal Democrat leader Sir Menzies Cambell is disappointed and cross.

10. If the tax rate does fall to 10p it will be because of America (Mail on Sunday)

James Forsyth identifies trans-Atlantic inspiration in Labour policy-making.

 

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Northern Ireland's political crisis ups the stakes for Theresa May

Unionism may be in greater immediate danger in Belfast than Edinburgh.

 Sinn Féin have announced that they will not put forward a candidate for deputy first minister, and barring a miracle, that means today's 4pm deadline for a new power-sharing executive will come and go. What next for Northern Ireland?

While another election is possible, it's not particularly likely. Although another contest might change the political composition at Stormont a little, when the dust settles, once again, the problem will be that the DUP and Sinn Féin are unable to agree terms to resume power-sharing.

That means a decade of devolved rule is ending and direct rule from Westminster is once again upon us. Who benefits? As Patrick explains in greater detail, a period of direct rule might be good news for Sinn Féin, who can go into the next set of elections in  the Republic of Ireland on an anti-austerity platform without the distracting matter of the austerity they are signing off in the North. The change at the top also allows that party to accelerate its move away from the hard men of the north and towards a leadership that is more palatable in the south..

Despite that, the DUP aren't as worried as you might expect. For one thing, a period of devolved rule, when the government at Westminster has a small majority isn't without upside for the DUP, who will continue to exert considerable leverage over May.

But the second factor is a belief that in the last election, Arlene Foster, their leader, flopped on the campaign trail with what was widely derided as a "fear" message about the consequences of the snap election instead of taking responsibility for involvement in the "cash for ash" scandal. That when the votes were cast, the Unionist majority at Stormont was wiped out means that message will have greater resonance next time than it did last time, or at least, that's how the theory runs.

Who's right? Who knows. But for Theresa May, it further ups the stakes for a good Brexit deal, particularly as far as the Irish border is concerned. A lot of the focus - including the PM's - is on her trip to Scotland and the stresses on that part of the Union. It may be that Unionism is in greater immediate danger in Belfast than Edinburgh.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.