Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Tell them less, Ed. You'll only scare them (Times)

Matthew Parris doubts the Labour leader knows what he'd do in power and advises him to stay quiet about it.

2. David Cameron's lonely ministers have been abandoned (Daily Telegraph)

Charles Moore joins the chorus lamenting panic and cowardice in the No.10 machine.

3. Pope Benedict has to answer for his failure on child abuse (Guardian)

The retiring pontiff needs to be held to account - in this life, not the next - writes Jonathan Freedland.

4. The Liberal Democrats are the only fair tax party (Guardian)

Treasury Chief Secretary Danny Alexander is unimpressed by Labour's late conversion to a Mansion Tax, among other things.

5. The horsemeat scandal shows how well our system works (Times)

A bit of rogue filly in the filet? No harm done, says Emma Duncan.

6. One more shambles, George, and you can kiss goodbye to the next election. (Daily Mail

Simon Heffer leans menacingly over the Chancellor as he does his fiscal homework.

7. More policies, Ed, you've misunderstood history (Independent)

By the equivalent stage in opposition, Blair and Brown had way more to say, according to Andrew Grice.

8. I have not felt the wrath of a special advisor - until this week (Independent)

Richard Garner agrees with the view that Michale Gove's political operation is ferocious.

9. Cyber-skullduggery threatens us all (Financial Times)

Misha Glenny on the disturbing implications of hi-tech crime.

10. Look up to anyone, just not sportsmen (Independent)

Philip Hensher is unimpressed by our athletic role models.

 

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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