Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Tell them less, Ed. You'll only scare them (Times)

Matthew Parris doubts the Labour leader knows what he'd do in power and advises him to stay quiet about it.

2. David Cameron's lonely ministers have been abandoned (Daily Telegraph)

Charles Moore joins the chorus lamenting panic and cowardice in the No.10 machine.

3. Pope Benedict has to answer for his failure on child abuse (Guardian)

The retiring pontiff needs to be held to account - in this life, not the next - writes Jonathan Freedland.

4. The Liberal Democrats are the only fair tax party (Guardian)

Treasury Chief Secretary Danny Alexander is unimpressed by Labour's late conversion to a Mansion Tax, among other things.

5. The horsemeat scandal shows how well our system works (Times)

A bit of rogue filly in the filet? No harm done, says Emma Duncan.

6. One more shambles, George, and you can kiss goodbye to the next election. (Daily Mail

Simon Heffer leans menacingly over the Chancellor as he does his fiscal homework.

7. More policies, Ed, you've misunderstood history (Independent)

By the equivalent stage in opposition, Blair and Brown had way more to say, according to Andrew Grice.

8. I have not felt the wrath of a special advisor - until this week (Independent)

Richard Garner agrees with the view that Michale Gove's political operation is ferocious.

9. Cyber-skullduggery threatens us all (Financial Times)

Misha Glenny on the disturbing implications of hi-tech crime.

10. Look up to anyone, just not sportsmen (Independent)

Philip Hensher is unimpressed by our athletic role models.

 

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PMQs review: Jeremy Corbyn bids for the NHS to rescue Labour

Ahead of tomorrow's by-elections, Corbyn damned Theresa May for putting the service in a "state of emergency".

Whenever Labour leaders are in trouble, they seek political refuge in the NHS. Jeremy Corbyn, whose party faces potential defeat in tomorrow’s Copeland and Stoke by-elections, upheld this iron law today. In the case of the former, Labour has already warned that “babies will die” as a result of the downgrading of the hospital. It is crude but it may yet prove effective (it worked for No to AV, after all).

In the chamber, Corbyn assailed May for cutting the number of hospital beds, worsening waiting times, under-funding social care and abolishing nursing bursaries. The Labour leader rose to a crescendo, damning the Prime Minister for putting the service in a “a state of emergency”. But his scattergun attack was too unfocused to much trouble May.

The Prime Minister came armed with attack lines, brandishing a quote from former health secretary Andy Burnham on cutting hospital beds and reminding Corbyn that Labour promised to spend less on the NHS at the last election (only Nixon can go to China). May was able to boast that the Tories were providing “more money” for the service (this is not, of course, the same as “enough”). Just as Corbyn echoed his predecessors, so the Prime Minister sounded like David Cameron circa 2013, declaring that she would not “take lessons” from the party that presided over the Mid-Staffs scandal and warning that Labour would “borrow and bankrupt” the economy.

It was a dubious charge from the party that has racked up ever-higher debt but a reliably potent one. Labour, however, will be satisfied that May was more comfortable debating the economy or attacking the Brown government, than she was defending the state of the NHS. In Copeland and Stoke, where Corbyn’s party has held power since 1935 and 1950, Labour must hope that the electorate are as respectful of tradition as its leader.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.