Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Tell them less, Ed. You'll only scare them (Times)

Matthew Parris doubts the Labour leader knows what he'd do in power and advises him to stay quiet about it.

2. David Cameron's lonely ministers have been abandoned (Daily Telegraph)

Charles Moore joins the chorus lamenting panic and cowardice in the No.10 machine.

3. Pope Benedict has to answer for his failure on child abuse (Guardian)

The retiring pontiff needs to be held to account - in this life, not the next - writes Jonathan Freedland.

4. The Liberal Democrats are the only fair tax party (Guardian)

Treasury Chief Secretary Danny Alexander is unimpressed by Labour's late conversion to a Mansion Tax, among other things.

5. The horsemeat scandal shows how well our system works (Times)

A bit of rogue filly in the filet? No harm done, says Emma Duncan.

6. One more shambles, George, and you can kiss goodbye to the next election. (Daily Mail

Simon Heffer leans menacingly over the Chancellor as he does his fiscal homework.

7. More policies, Ed, you've misunderstood history (Independent)

By the equivalent stage in opposition, Blair and Brown had way more to say, according to Andrew Grice.

8. I have not felt the wrath of a special advisor - until this week (Independent)

Richard Garner agrees with the view that Michale Gove's political operation is ferocious.

9. Cyber-skullduggery threatens us all (Financial Times)

Misha Glenny on the disturbing implications of hi-tech crime.

10. Look up to anyone, just not sportsmen (Independent)

Philip Hensher is unimpressed by our athletic role models.

 

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.