Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

Morning Call: pick of the papers The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers. 1. 2012: the year we did our best to abandon the natural world (Guardian)

Emissions are rising, ice is melting and yet the response of governments is simply to pretend that none of it is happening, says George Mobiot.

2. Now's the moment for mindfulness (Telegraph)

Make a fresh start in 2013 with the acclaimed technique that clears your head of information overload and allows you to focus on the present, says Judith Woods.

3. We risk a repeat of Dr Beeching’s mistakes (Times)(£)

The man who closed railway lines was right to make cuts, but missed the need to invest in a modern network, says Andrew Adonis.

4. In 2013, seismic events will shape the Middle East (FT) (£)

The region offers no respite to international or local actors, writes David Gardner.

5. Women: don’t even think of applying to this orchestra (Times)(£)

One female player had nine years on probation after having children, writes Neil Fisther.

6. A US warning for the Conservatives: pander to Ukip at your peril(Guardian)

Courting Tea Party voters cost Romney the election. If Cameron isn't careful, Farage's party could cause similar havoc here, says John Kampfner.

7. The Magna Carta: an old piece of parchment that made England a nation – let's celebrate it(Telegraph)

The 800th anniversary of Magna Carta, in 2015, is fast approaching, and we should do it justice, says Philip Johnston.

8. Forty years on, the benefits of EU membership are no longer compelling (Independent)

Then we thought it was a matter of economics, not politics - and we still do today - but the rest of Europe doesn't, says Dominic Lawson.

9. 2013 brings grounds for Tory optimism (Daily Mail)

The Mail remains optimistic that 2013 could be a good year for David Cameron and his party.

10. The lost boys of Sudan's civil war (Independent)

Thousands of children were separated from their families and forced to become soldiers in a country ravaged by war, reports Dan Howden.

 

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Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"