Morning Call: pick of the papers

Ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Britain can't pick and choose on Europe - we're either in or we're out (Guardian)

Jonathan Freedland ponders Cameron's meander to the EU exit and laments.

2. Manners Mr Cameron, no more Mr Shouty (Times)

The Prime Minister should define himself against the hectoring format of Wesminster politics, suggests Matthew Parris.

3. UK should welcome timely words from the US (FT)

Gideon Rachman is glad the Obama administration has put in a wake-up to those in Britain flirting with EU exit.

4. A broom cupboard of ones own: why solving the housing crisis is not an impossible dream (Indepndent)

A generation frozen out of home ownership will change the terms of political debate, says Ross Clark.

5. Tory Eurosceptics' impossible demand on Cameron (Guardian)

Nicholas Watt analysis the Prime Ministers Brussels-bashing predicament.

6. Long after Jimmy Savile, our society normalises sexual assault and shames women into silence (Independent)

Victims are blamed and women made to feel responsible for avoiding assault, writes Laura Bates. 

7. Osborne not in the numbers game (Scotsman)

Alf Young is appalled by Treasury complacency over dodgy inflation statistics.

8. The Man who turned amorality into an art form (Mail)

Ian Birrel gets stuck right into Tony Blair's globe-trotting business affairs.

9. As Australia burns, attitudes are changing - but is it too late? (Guardian)

The brutal truth about climate change is dawning down under, says Tim Flannery.

10. Treating every allegation against Jimmy Saville as a 'fact' undermines justice (Telegraph)

Charles Moore is not persuaded that Operation Yewtree brings us closer to the truth.

Show Hide image

En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.