Morning Call: pick of the papers

Ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Britain can't pick and choose on Europe - we're either in or we're out (Guardian)

Jonathan Freedland ponders Cameron's meander to the EU exit and laments.

2. Manners Mr Cameron, no more Mr Shouty (Times)

The Prime Minister should define himself against the hectoring format of Wesminster politics, suggests Matthew Parris.

3. UK should welcome timely words from the US (FT)

Gideon Rachman is glad the Obama administration has put in a wake-up to those in Britain flirting with EU exit.

4. A broom cupboard of ones own: why solving the housing crisis is not an impossible dream (Indepndent)

A generation frozen out of home ownership will change the terms of political debate, says Ross Clark.

5. Tory Eurosceptics' impossible demand on Cameron (Guardian)

Nicholas Watt analysis the Prime Ministers Brussels-bashing predicament.

6. Long after Jimmy Savile, our society normalises sexual assault and shames women into silence (Independent)

Victims are blamed and women made to feel responsible for avoiding assault, writes Laura Bates. 

7. Osborne not in the numbers game (Scotsman)

Alf Young is appalled by Treasury complacency over dodgy inflation statistics.

8. The Man who turned amorality into an art form (Mail)

Ian Birrel gets stuck right into Tony Blair's globe-trotting business affairs.

9. As Australia burns, attitudes are changing - but is it too late? (Guardian)

The brutal truth about climate change is dawning down under, says Tim Flannery.

10. Treating every allegation against Jimmy Saville as a 'fact' undermines justice (Telegraph)

Charles Moore is not persuaded that Operation Yewtree brings us closer to the truth.

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Nigel Farage: welcoming refugees will lead to "migrant tide" of jihadists

Ukip's leader Nigel Farage claims that housing refugees will allow Isis to smuggle in "jihadists".

Nigel Farage has warned that granting sanctuary to refugees could result in Britain being influenced by Isis. 

In remarks that were immediately condemned online, the Ukip leader said "When ISIS say they will flood the migrant tide with 500,000 of their own jihadists, we'd better listen", before saying that Angela Merkel, the German Chancellor, had done something "very dangerous" in attempting to host refugees, saying that she was "compounding the pull factors" that lead migrants to attempt the treacherous Mediterranean crossing.

Farage, who has four children, said that as a father, he was "horrified" by the photographs of small children drowned on a European beach, but said housing more refugees would simply make the problem worse. 

The Ukip leader, who failed for the fifth successive occassion to be elected as an MP in May, said he welcomed the prospect of a Jeremy Corbyn victory, describing it as a "good result". Corbyn is more sceptical about the European Union than his rivals for the Labour leadership, which Farage believes will provide the nascent Out campaign with a boost. 

 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.