Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Cameron's absurd behaviour over EU membership (Guardian)

Placing a question mark over Britain's European Union membership and its benefits is economically disastrous, says Peter Mandelson

2. US joins misguided pursuit of austerity (Financial Times)

Governments have pushed themselves into a corner where austerity is the default choice, writes Wolfgang Münchau.

3. The PM should have more respect for Ukip (Daily Telegraph)

It is counterproductive for Cameron to mock voters who don’t want a Miliband government, argues Paul Goodman.

4. The Tories intend going on and on. Labour needs a radical alternative (Independent)

A Tory government at a time of economic crisis is a national tragedy, says Owen Jones. Cameron’s hopes of another term must be destroyed.

5. Tea Party’s moment of maximum leverage (Financial Times)

The question is whether they dive into their own political abyss in unison or in pieces, says Edward Luce.

6. What a relief! The madness of child benefit for all ends today (Daily Telegraph)

It makes no sense for the affluent middle classes to be showered with taxpayers’ cash, says Boris Johnson.

7. There is no soft option for our leaders now (Times) (£)

Cameron and Clegg should tell us that austerity is a necessary evil, writes Tim Montgomerie. Just look at the French ‘alternative’.

8. The Tory crisis that's keeping Balls smirking (Daily Mail)

The Conservatives can’t find a candidate to stand against Ed Balls at the next election, writes Andrew Pierce.

9. Westminster and welfare: the politics of 'them and us' (Guardian)

Over the second half of this parliament, ministers will have a hard time keeping up an increasingly false distinction, says a Guardian editorial.

10. We are wallowing in Labour’s debt so why is Ed blocking cuts? (Sun)

As long as Miliband continues to stay silent on how to cut his government’s debt, he has no right to suggest voters must spend more, writes Trevor Kavanagh.

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Tory Brexiter Daniel Hannan: Leave campaign never promised "radical decline" in immigration

The voters might not agree...

BBC Newsnight on Twitter

It was the Leave campaign's pledge to reduce EU immigration that won it the referendum. But Daniel Hannan struck a rather different tone on last night's Newsnight. "It means free movement of labour," the Conservative MEP said of the post-Brexit model he envisaged. An exasperated Evan Davis replied: “I’m sorry we’ve just been through three months of agony on the issue of immigration. The public have been led to believe that what they have voted for is an end to free movement." 

Hannan protested that EU migrants would lose "legal entitlements to live in other countries, to vote in other countries and to claim welfare and to have the same university tuition". But Davis wasn't backing down. "Why didn't you say this in the campaign? Why didn't you say in the campaign that you were wanting a scheme where we have free movement of labour? Come on, that's completely at odds with what the public think they have just voted for." 

Hannan concluded: "We never said there was going to be some radical decline ... we want a measure of control". Your Mole suspects many voters assumed otherwise. If immigration is barely changed, Hannan and others will soon be burned by the very fires they stoked. 

I'm a mole, innit.