Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Cameron's absurd behaviour over EU membership (Guardian)

Placing a question mark over Britain's European Union membership and its benefits is economically disastrous, says Peter Mandelson

2. US joins misguided pursuit of austerity (Financial Times)

Governments have pushed themselves into a corner where austerity is the default choice, writes Wolfgang Münchau.

3. The PM should have more respect for Ukip (Daily Telegraph)

It is counterproductive for Cameron to mock voters who don’t want a Miliband government, argues Paul Goodman.

4. The Tories intend going on and on. Labour needs a radical alternative (Independent)

A Tory government at a time of economic crisis is a national tragedy, says Owen Jones. Cameron’s hopes of another term must be destroyed.

5. Tea Party’s moment of maximum leverage (Financial Times)

The question is whether they dive into their own political abyss in unison or in pieces, says Edward Luce.

6. What a relief! The madness of child benefit for all ends today (Daily Telegraph)

It makes no sense for the affluent middle classes to be showered with taxpayers’ cash, says Boris Johnson.

7. There is no soft option for our leaders now (Times) (£)

Cameron and Clegg should tell us that austerity is a necessary evil, writes Tim Montgomerie. Just look at the French ‘alternative’.

8. The Tory crisis that's keeping Balls smirking (Daily Mail)

The Conservatives can’t find a candidate to stand against Ed Balls at the next election, writes Andrew Pierce.

9. Westminster and welfare: the politics of 'them and us' (Guardian)

Over the second half of this parliament, ministers will have a hard time keeping up an increasingly false distinction, says a Guardian editorial.

10. We are wallowing in Labour’s debt so why is Ed blocking cuts? (Sun)

As long as Miliband continues to stay silent on how to cut his government’s debt, he has no right to suggest voters must spend more, writes Trevor Kavanagh.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.