Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Britain badly needs an Abraham Lincoln who will think big and act big (Daily Telegraph)

MPs in both the Conservatives and Labour are yearning for a leader who will show courage and imagination, writes Mary Riddell.

2. A perilous journey to full recovery (Financial Times)

The key to success everywhere will be timing the exit from exceptional policies, writes Martin Wolf. 

3. Britain's narrow view of the EU is wrong (Times) (£)

Berlin shares David Cameron’s desire for reform in Brussels but not his vision for Europe, says German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle.

4. UK intervention in Mali treads a familiar – and doomed – path (Guardian)

Does Mali pose an "existential threat" to the UK? Hardly, says Simon Jenkins. Intervention will bring only more trouble.

5. Hillary Clinton leaves a hard job well done (Independent)

The Secretary of State leaves no signature achievement, but America is safer now than it was, says an Independent editorial. 

6. Murdoch links sympathy for Palestinians to anti-Semitism. The truth is more complex (Independent)

Wishing an end to Palestinian suffering is not synonymous with willing the annihilation of Israel, so why is this distinction so hard to make, asks Matthew Norman. 

7. We'll give parents the confidence they crave from early years education (Guardian)

Nurseries should give children the chance to learn, and women the choice to work if they want to, writes early years minister Elizabeth Truss.

8. Childcare plan: the kids are not all right (Guardian)

The biggest danger posed by the coalition's reforms is that they will create a new class divide at the earliest ages, says a Guardian editorial.

9. India casts around for more outrage (Financial Times)

Taking offence has become a newly powerful type of political power, writes James Crabtree.

10. A continent in chaos and why Hitler's evil is rising again (Daily Mail)

The fact that so many are willing to forget or ignore Hitler’s evil, means that Europe should approach its future with dread, says Simon Heffer.

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Theresa May is paying the price for mismanaging Boris Johnson

The Foreign Secretary's bruised ego may end up destroying Theresa May. 

And to think that Theresa May scheduled her big speech for this Friday to make sure that Conservative party conference wouldn’t be dominated by the matter of Brexit. Now, thanks to Boris Johnson, it won’t just be her conference, but Labour’s, which is overshadowed by Brexit in general and Tory in-fighting in particular. (One imagines that the Labour leadership will find a way to cope somehow.)

May is paying the price for mismanaging Johnson during her period of political hegemony after she became leader. After he was betrayed by Michael Gove and lacking any particular faction in the parliamentary party, she brought him back from the brink of political death by making him Foreign Secretary, but also used her strength and his weakness to shrink his empire.

The Foreign Office had its responsibility for negotiating Brexit hived off to the newly-created Department for Exiting the European Union (Dexeu) and for navigating post-Brexit trade deals to the Department of International Trade. Johnson was given control of one of the great offices of state, but with no responsibility at all for the greatest foreign policy challenge since the Second World War.

Adding to his discomfort, the new Foreign Secretary was regularly the subject of jokes from the Prime Minister and cabinet colleagues. May likened him to a dog that had to be put down. Philip Hammond quipped about him during his joke-fuelled 2017 Budget. All of which gave Johnson’s allies the impression that Johnson-hunting was a licensed sport as far as Downing Street was concerned. He was then shut out of the election campaign and has continued to be a marginalised figure even as the disappointing election result forced May to involve the wider cabinet in policymaking.

His sense of exclusion from the discussions around May’s Florence speech only added to his sense of isolation. May forgot that if you aren’t going to kill, don’t wound: now, thanks to her lost majority, she can’t afford to put any of the Brexiteers out in the cold, and Johnson is once again where he wants to be: centre-stage. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.