Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. A-level reforms: Michael Gove's bid to grab headlines will merely narrow pupils' learning (Guardian)

The education secretary, an ex-journalist, knows how to sell reforms for the rightwing press, writes Peter Wilby. But it's no way to run our schools.

2. Coalition's constituency boundary reforms are a complete mess and an insult to voters (Daily Mail)

Trust will be reduced, confidence eroded and the political class once again will lose public faith for playing irrelevant games, writes David Blunkett.

3. Could the Tories' plan for re-election in 2015 cost just 10p? (Guardian)

A new tax band might entice hard-hit voters to look again at the party, and would be billed as righting a Labour wrong, writes Gavin Kelly. 

4. Modern Essex man who has the key to victory (Times) (£)

Europe alone won’t be enough to win in 2015, writes Tim Montgomerie. The Conservatives must become the party of the little people.

5. Why the left should support a referendum on Europe (Guardian)

 The EU is an elite project without popular support, says Vernon Bogdanor. Labour can bring it back to the people.

6. Only a coward would deny the people their voice on Europe (Daily Telegraph)

Ed Miliband's rejection of an in-out EU referendum is blatantly undemocratic, argues Boris Johnson.

7. Time to decide on UK defence policy (Financial Times)

Cameron must scale back either the rhetoric or the cuts, says an FT editorial. 

8. What my generation can learn from the Holocaust (Independent)

We should recall that hatred continues to be fanned against entire peoples, and that man is capable of both wonderful benevolence and unspeakable horrors, writes Owen Jones.

9. We need a big speech on the economy now (Sun)

The measures planned by new Bank of England governor Mark Carney will be controversial, writes Trevor Kavanagh. Cameron must explain them to voters worried about their jobs and savings.

10. An open letter to Nick Clegg on the matter of his children possibly being educated privately (Independent)

The Deputy Prime Minister, educated at Westminster School himself, says the State sector isn't good enough for his children, writes John O'Farrell. He doesn't know what he's talking about.

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I believe only Yvette Cooper has the breadth of support to beat Jeremy Corbyn

All the recent polling suggests Andy Burnham is losing more votes than anyone else to Jeremy Corbyn, says Diana Johnson MP.

Tom Blenkinsop MP on the New Statesman website today says he is giving his second preference to Andy Burnham as he thinks that Andy has the best chance of beating Jeremy.

This is on the basis that if Yvette goes out first all her second preferences will swing behind Andy, whereas if Andy goes out first then his second preferences, due to the broad alliance he has created behind his campaign, will all or largely switch to the other male candidate, Jeremy.

Let's take a deep breath and try and think through what will be the effect of preferential voting in the Labour leadership.

First of all, it is very difficult to know how second preferences will switch. From my telephone canvassing there is some rather interesting voting going on, but I don't accept that Tom’s analysis is correct. I have certainly picked up growing support for Yvette in recent weeks.

In fact you can argue the reverse of Tom’s analysis is true – Andy has moved further away from the centre and, as a result, his pitch to those like Tom who are supporting Liz first is now narrower. As a result, Yvette is more likely to pick up those second preferences.

Stats from the Yvette For Labour team show Yvette picking up the majority of second preferences from all candidates – from the Progress wing supporting Liz to the softer left fans of Jeremy – and Andy's supporters too. Their figures show many undecideds opting for Yvette as their first preference, as well as others choosing to switch their first preference to Yvette from one of the other candidates. It's for this reason I still believe only Yvette has the breadth of support to beat Jeremy and then to go on to win in 2020.

It's interesting that Andy has not been willing to make it clear that second preferences should go to Yvette or Liz. Yvette has been very clear that she would encourage second preferences to be for Andy or Liz.

Having watched Andy on Sky's Murnaghan show this morning, he categorically states that Labour will not get beyond first base with the electorate at a general election if we are not economically credible and that fundamentally Jeremy's economic plans do not add up. So, I am unsure why Andy is so unwilling to be clear on second preferences.

All the recent polling suggests Andy is losing more votes than anyone else to Jeremy. He trails fourth in London – where a huge proportion of our electorate is based.

So I would urge Tom to reflect more widely on who is best placed to provide the strongest opposition to the Tories, appeal to the widest group of voters and reach out to the communities we need to win back. I believe that this has to be Yvette.

The Newsnight focus group a few days ago showed that Yvette is best placed to win back those former Labour voters we will need in 2020.

Labour will pay a massive price if we ignore this.

Diana Johnson is the Labour MP for Hull North.