Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read commment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. US has been let down by its leadership (Financial Times)

A deal that extends unsustainable tax cuts for 98 per cent of Americans is no victory, says Nouriel Roubini.

2. Iain Duncan Smith's polemic is politics at its most cynical (Guardian)

How does the secretary of state's conceit, that in-work benefit claimants are fraudsters, serve the public interest, asks Zoe Williams.

3. Cosy up to China – are you sure about that? (Times) (£)

It’s easy to envy the boom, but as Beijing’s influence spreads around the globe we must confront the human cost, says David Aaronovitch.

4. We can end the elderly care lottery (Guardian)

Means-testing winter fuel payments could prevent old people losing their assets and their dignity, argues Paul Burstow.

5. Let taxpayers share rail fare pain (Independent)

More effort must be made to spread the investment costs more widely, says an Independent editorial.

6. Britain would vote to stay in the EU (Financial Times)

The UK electorate would almost certainly opt for the status quo, writes Gideon Rachman.

7. Fighting back against the left-wing guerrillas (Daily Telegraph)

Foes of public sector reform are waging war at a local level – they must be roundly beaten, says Sean Worth.

8. America could still go over the cliff — and take the rest of us with it (Daily Mail)

The American people, and, indeed, the rest of the world, urgently need to revise their view of how economically strong this ailing superpower really is, says Simon Heffer.

9. Christopher Martin-Jenkins: we're all the poorer for his passing (Daily Telegraph)

Our institutions need many more 'outsiders’ with the enthusiasm and knowledge of Christopher Martin-Jenkins, says Peter Oborne.

10. Cosmetic surgery is bad. That women feel the need for it is worse (Independent)

Now even the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons is demanding change, writes Mary Ann Sieghart.

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For a mayor who will help make Londoners healthier, vote for Tessa Jowell

The surgeon, former Labour health minister and chairman of the London Health Commission, Ara Darzi, backs Tessa Jowell to be Labour's candidate for London mayor.

London’s mayor matters. As the world’s preeminent city, London possesses an enormous wealth of assets: energetic and enterprising people, successful businesses, a strong public sector, good infrastructure and more parks and green spaces than any other capital city.

Yet these aren’t put to work to promote the health of Londoners. Indeed, quite the opposite: right now, London faces a public health emergency.

More than a million Londoners still smoke tobacco, with 67 children lighting up for the first time every day. London’s air quality is silently killing us. We have the dirtiest air in Europe, causing more than 4,000 premature deaths every year.

Nearly four million Londoners are obese or overweight – and just 13% of us walk or cycle to school or work, despite half of us living close enough to do so. All Londoners should be ashamed that we have the highest rate of childhood obesity of any major global city.

It’s often been said that we don’t value our health until we lose it. As a cancer surgeon, I am certain that is true. And I know that London can do better. 

For that reason, twice in the past decade, I’ve led movements of Londoners working together to improve health and to improve the NHS. Healthcare for London gave our prescription for a better NHS in the capital. And Better Health for London showed how Londoners could be helped to better health, as well as better healthcare.

In my time championing health in London, I’ve never met a politician more committed to doing the right thing for Londoners’ health than Tessa Jowell. That’s why I’m backing her as Labour’s choice for mayor. We need a mayor who will deliver real change, and Tessa will be that mayor.  

When she invited me to discuss Better Health for London, she had the courage to commit to doing what is right, no matter how hard the politics. Above all, she wanted to know how many lives would be saved or improved, and what she could do to help.

In Tessa, I see extraordinary passion, boundless energy and unwavering determination to help others.

For all Londoners, the healthiest choice isn’t always easy and isn’t always obvious. Every day, we make hundreds of choices that affect our health – how we get to and from school or work, what we choose to eat, how we spend our free time.

As mayor, Tessa Jowell will help Londoners by making each of those individual decisions that bit easier. And in that difference is everything: making small changes individually will make a huge difference collectively.  

Tessa is committed to helping London’s children in their early years – just as she did in government by delivering Sure Start. Tessa will tackle London’s childhood obesity epidemic by getting children moving just as she did with the Olympics. Tessa will make London a walking city – helping all of us to healthier lifestyles.

And yes, she’s got the guts to make our parks and public places smoke free, helping adults to choose to stop smoking and preventing children from starting.   

The real test of leadership is not to dream up great ideas or make grand speeches. It is to build coalitions to make change happen. It is to deliver real improvements to daily life. Only Tessa has the track record of delivery – from the Olympics to Sure Start.   

Like many in our capital, I am a Londoner by choice. I am here because I believe that London is the greatest city in the world – and is bursting with potential to be even greater.

The Labour party now has a crucial choice to make. London needs Labour to choose Tessa, to give Londoners the chance to choose better health.