Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. End the damaging obsession with deficit (Financial Times)

America must not lose sight of infrastructure, jobs and growth, says Lawrence Summers.

2. Cameron's message is Tory but his enemies have drowned it out (Daily Telegraph)

The PM is allowing his adversaries to define him, says Benedict Brogan. Will the real party leader please stand up?

3. Cameron is lucky to have a Foreign Secretary with experience but no political ambition (Independent)

Unusually, Hague can be candid with Cameron without fearing for his political future, writes Steve Richards. He does not seek a future.

4. Israel’s moderate voices won't be heard at this election (Daily Telegraph)

The loudest applause is reserved for the new right and talk of peace with the Palestinians is increasingly drowned out, writes Peter Oborne.

5. Algeria hostage crisis aftermath: only folly lasts for decades (Guardian)

With such a history of failure in Muslim countries one would have thought David Cameron would choose his words with more care, says a Guardian editorial.

6. Custodian of an interventionist legacy (Financial Times)

Cameron filters Blair’s basic arguments through a very Tory temperament, writes Janan Ganesh. 

7. Algeria head good – Europe head bad (Times) (£)

The EU is an old and damaging distraction for Cameron, says Rachel Sylvester. He looks stronger dealing with modern issues.

8. I agree with Churchill: let's get stuck into the real shirkers (Guardian)

They parasitise us from above, writes George Monbiot. But landowners and the Tory party's idle rich are spared the fairest and simplest of taxes.

9. An action-packed thriller is about to unfold in Davos, Switzerland (Guardian)

In secret meetings in tiny rooms, the rich plot to get even richer, writes Aditya Chakrabortty.

10. A crisis of leadership in the western world (Daily Mail)

The west is now run by a new class of career politician, with no expertise in anything beyond spinning a line at election, says a Daily Mail leader.

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How Theresa May laid a trap for herself on the immigration target

When Home Secretary, she insisted on keeping foreign students in the figures – causing a headache for herself today.

When Home Secretary, Theresa May insisted that foreign students should continue to be counted in the overall immigration figures. Some cabinet colleagues, including then Business Secretary Vince Cable and Chancellor George Osborne wanted to reverse this. It was economically illiterate. Current ministers, like the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, Chancellor Philip Hammond and Home Secretary Amber Rudd, also want foreign students exempted from the total.

David Cameron’s government aimed to cut immigration figures – including overseas students in that aim meant trying to limit one of the UK’s crucial financial resources. They are worth £25bn to the UK economy, and their fees make up 14 per cent of total university income. And the impact is not just financial – welcoming foreign students is diplomatically and culturally key to Britain’s reputation and its relationship with the rest of the world too. Even more important now Brexit is on its way.

But they stayed in the figures – a situation that, along with counterproductive visa restrictions also introduced by May’s old department, put a lot of foreign students off studying here. For example, there has been a 44 per cent decrease in the number of Indian students coming to Britain to study in the last five years.

Now May’s stubbornness on the migration figures appears to have caught up with her. The Times has revealed that the Prime Minister is ready to “soften her longstanding opposition to taking foreign students out of immigration totals”. It reports that she will offer to change the way the numbers are calculated.

Why the u-turn? No 10 says the concession is to ensure the Higher and Research Bill, key university legislation, can pass due to a Lords amendment urging the government not to count students as “long-term migrants” for “public policy purposes”.

But it will also be a factor in May’s manifesto pledge (and continuation of Cameron’s promise) to cut immigration to the “tens of thousands”. Until today, ministers had been unclear about whether this would be in the manifesto.

Now her u-turn on student figures is being seized upon by opposition parties as “massaging” the migration figures to meet her target. An accusation for which May only has herself, and her steadfast politicising of immigration, to blame.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

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