Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. End the damaging obsession with deficit (Financial Times)

America must not lose sight of infrastructure, jobs and growth, says Lawrence Summers.

2. Cameron's message is Tory but his enemies have drowned it out (Daily Telegraph)

The PM is allowing his adversaries to define him, says Benedict Brogan. Will the real party leader please stand up?

3. Cameron is lucky to have a Foreign Secretary with experience but no political ambition (Independent)

Unusually, Hague can be candid with Cameron without fearing for his political future, writes Steve Richards. He does not seek a future.

4. Israel’s moderate voices won't be heard at this election (Daily Telegraph)

The loudest applause is reserved for the new right and talk of peace with the Palestinians is increasingly drowned out, writes Peter Oborne.

5. Algeria hostage crisis aftermath: only folly lasts for decades (Guardian)

With such a history of failure in Muslim countries one would have thought David Cameron would choose his words with more care, says a Guardian editorial.

6. Custodian of an interventionist legacy (Financial Times)

Cameron filters Blair’s basic arguments through a very Tory temperament, writes Janan Ganesh. 

7. Algeria head good – Europe head bad (Times) (£)

The EU is an old and damaging distraction for Cameron, says Rachel Sylvester. He looks stronger dealing with modern issues.

8. I agree with Churchill: let's get stuck into the real shirkers (Guardian)

They parasitise us from above, writes George Monbiot. But landowners and the Tory party's idle rich are spared the fairest and simplest of taxes.

9. An action-packed thriller is about to unfold in Davos, Switzerland (Guardian)

In secret meetings in tiny rooms, the rich plot to get even richer, writes Aditya Chakrabortty.

10. A crisis of leadership in the western world (Daily Mail)

The west is now run by a new class of career politician, with no expertise in anything beyond spinning a line at election, says a Daily Mail leader.

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The US intelligence leaks on the Manchester attack are part of a disturbing pattern

Even the United States' strongest allies cannot rely on this president or his administration to keep their secrets.

A special relationship, indeed. British intelligence services will stop sharing information with their American counterparts about the Manchester bombing after leaks persisted even after public rebukes from Amber Rudd (who called the leaks "irritating") and Michael Fallon (who branded them "disappointing").

In what must be a diplomatic first, Britain isn't even the first of the United States' allies to review its intelligence sharing protocols this week. The Israeli government have also "reviewed" their approach to intelligence sharing with Washington after Donald Trump first blabbed information about Isis to the Russian ambassador from a "close ally" of the United States and then told reporters, unprompted, that he had "never mentioned Israel" in the conversation.

Whether the Manchester leaks emanate from political officials appointed by Trump - many of whom tend to be, if you're feeling generous, cranks of the highest order - or discontent with Trump has caused a breakdown in discipline further down the chain, what's clear is that something is very rotten in the Trump administration.

Elsewhere, a transcript of Trump's call to the Philippine strongman Rodrigo Duterte in which the American president revealed that two nuclear submarines had been deployed off the coast of North Korea, has been widely leaked to the American press

It's all part of a clear and disturbing pattern, that even the United States' strongest allies in Tel Aviv and London cannot rely on this president or his administration to keep their secrets.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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