Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Obama's second inaugural address: don't believe the conciliatory language (Guardian)

Inaugural speeches are always mushy, but make no mistake: the economy, gun control and immigration are going to be divisive, writes Michael Cohen.

2. British politics urgently needs a new force - a movement on the left to counter capitalism's crisis (Independent)

If a new, networked movement of the left could agree on some key principles, and avoid creating another battleground for ultra-left sects, it could give a voice to millions, writes Owen Jones.

3. What ties David Cameron's EU policy to his stirring words on Algeria? Impatience (Guardian)

Pick a fight in Brussels, send in a taskforce, shake it all up – on foreign policy Cameron's like a bull in a china shop, says Gaby Hinsliff.

4. We need the world’s policeman back on duty (Times) (£)

Devastation in Syria, Islamist terror in North Africa — there is a bloody cost to when the US fails to intervene, says Tim Montgomerie.

5. Why is David Cameron so in thrall to this blunderer? (Daily Mail)

MPs' criticism that Jeremy Heywood was not rigorous enough over the Anderew Mitchell affair is all too familiar, writes Andrew Pierce.

6. Given the state of Britain's economy, Capable (Mark) Carney needs to work miracles (Independent)

There are huge expectations of the new Bank of England Governor, and he won't be able to live up to them. But he could start by learning from the Federal Reserve, says David Blanchflower.

7. The union at Europe’s heart is frayed (Financial Times)

François Heisbourg says he is deeply struck by the loss of Franco-German intimacy.

8. Mokhtar Belmokhtar: the world’s most wanted (Daily Telegraph)

The Algerian crisis has turned Belmokhtar from a minor warlord into the West’s number one target, says Richard Spencer.

9. Obama must atone for his carbon omissions (Financial Times)

His promise of energy security no substitute for action on global warming, writes Edward Luce.

10. It’s snowing, and it really feels like the start of a mini ice age (Daily Telegraph)

Something appears to be up with our winter weather, and to call it "warming" is obviously to strain the language, writes Boris Johnson.

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Jeremy Corbyn will stay on the Labour leadership ballot paper, judge rules

Labour donor Michael Foster had challenged the decision at the High Court.

The High Court has ruled that Jeremy Corbyn should be allowed to automatically run again for Labour leader after the decision of the party's National Executive Committee was challenged. 

Corbyn declared it a "waste of time" and an attempt to overturn the right of Labour members to choose their leader.

The decision ends the hope of some anti-Corbyn Labour members that he could be excluded from the contest altogether.

The legal challenge had been brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate, who maintained he was simply seeking the views of experts.

But when the experts spoke, it was in Corbyn's favour. 

The ruling said: "Accordingly, the Judge accepted that the decision of the NEC was correct and that Mr Corbyn was entitled to be a candidate in the forthcoming election without the need for nominations."

This judgement was "wholly unaffected by political considerations", it added. 

Corbyn said: "I welcome the decision by the High Court to respect the democracy of the Labour Party.

"This has been a waste of time and resources when our party should be focused on holding the government to account.

"There should have been no question of the right of half a million Labour party members to choose their own leader being overturned. If anything, the aim should be to expand the number of voters in this election. I hope all candidates and supporters will reject any attempt to prolong this process, and that we can now proceed with the election in a comradely and respectful manner."

Iain McNicol, general secretary of the Labour Party, said: “We are delighted that the Court has upheld the authority and decision of the National Executive Committee of the Labour Party. 

“We will continue with the leadership election as agreed by the NEC."

If Corbyn had been excluded, he would have had to seek the nomination of 51 MPs, which would have been difficult since just 40 voted against the no confidence motion in him. He would therefore have been effectively excluded from running. 

Owen Smith, the candidate backed by rebel MPs, told the BBC earlier he believed Corbyn should stay on the ballot paper. 

He said after the judgement: “I’m pleased the court has done the right thing and ruled that Jeremy should be on the ballot. This now puts to bed any questions about the process, so we can get on with discussing the issues that really matter."

The news was greeted with celebration by Corbyn supporters.