Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Obama's second inaugural address: don't believe the conciliatory language (Guardian)

Inaugural speeches are always mushy, but make no mistake: the economy, gun control and immigration are going to be divisive, writes Michael Cohen.

2. British politics urgently needs a new force - a movement on the left to counter capitalism's crisis (Independent)

If a new, networked movement of the left could agree on some key principles, and avoid creating another battleground for ultra-left sects, it could give a voice to millions, writes Owen Jones.

3. What ties David Cameron's EU policy to his stirring words on Algeria? Impatience (Guardian)

Pick a fight in Brussels, send in a taskforce, shake it all up – on foreign policy Cameron's like a bull in a china shop, says Gaby Hinsliff.

4. We need the world’s policeman back on duty (Times) (£)

Devastation in Syria, Islamist terror in North Africa — there is a bloody cost to when the US fails to intervene, says Tim Montgomerie.

5. Why is David Cameron so in thrall to this blunderer? (Daily Mail)

MPs' criticism that Jeremy Heywood was not rigorous enough over the Anderew Mitchell affair is all too familiar, writes Andrew Pierce.

6. Given the state of Britain's economy, Capable (Mark) Carney needs to work miracles (Independent)

There are huge expectations of the new Bank of England Governor, and he won't be able to live up to them. But he could start by learning from the Federal Reserve, says David Blanchflower.

7. The union at Europe’s heart is frayed (Financial Times)

François Heisbourg says he is deeply struck by the loss of Franco-German intimacy.

8. Mokhtar Belmokhtar: the world’s most wanted (Daily Telegraph)

The Algerian crisis has turned Belmokhtar from a minor warlord into the West’s number one target, says Richard Spencer.

9. Obama must atone for his carbon omissions (Financial Times)

His promise of energy security no substitute for action on global warming, writes Edward Luce.

10. It’s snowing, and it really feels like the start of a mini ice age (Daily Telegraph)

Something appears to be up with our winter weather, and to call it "warming" is obviously to strain the language, writes Boris Johnson.

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Voters are turning against Brexit but the Lib Dems aren't benefiting

Labour's pro-Brexit stance is not preventing it from winning the support of Remainers. Will that change?

More than a year after the UK voted for Brexit, there has been little sign of buyer's remorse. The public, including around a third of Remainers, are largely of the view that the government should "get on with it".

But as real wages are squeezed (owing to the Brexit-linked inflationary spike) there are tentative signs that the mood is changing. In the event of a second referendum, an Opinium/Observer poll found, 47 per cent would vote Remain, compared to 44 per cent for Leave. Support for a repeat vote is also increasing. Forty one per cent of the public now favour a second referendum (with 48 per cent opposed), compared to 33 per cent last December. 

The Liberal Democrats have made halting Brexit their raison d'être. But as public opinion turns, there is no sign they are benefiting. Since the election, Vince Cable's party has yet to exceed single figures in the polls, scoring a lowly 6 per cent in the Opinium survey (down from 7.4 per cent at the election). 

What accounts for this disparity? After their near-extinction in 2015, the Lib Dems remain either toxic or irrelevant to many voters. Labour, by contrast, despite its pro-Brexit stance, has hoovered up Remainers (55 per cent back Jeremy Corbyn's party). 

In some cases, this reflects voters' other priorities. Remainers are prepared to support Labour on account of the party's stances on austerity, housing and education. Corbyn, meanwhile, is a eurosceptic whose internationalism and pro-migration reputation endear him to EU supporters. Other Remainers rewarded Labour MPs who voted against Article 50, rebelling against the leadership's stance. 

But the trend also partly reflects ignorance. By saying little on the subject of Brexit, Corbyn and Labour allowed Remainers to assume the best. Though there is little evidence that voters will abandon Corbyn over his EU stance, the potential exists.

For this reason, the proposal of a new party will continue to recur. By challenging Labour over Brexit, without the toxicity of Lib Dems, it would sharpen the choice before voters. Though it would not win an election, a new party could force Corbyn to soften his stance on Brexit or to offer a second referendum (mirroring Ukip's effect on the Conservatives).

The greatest problem for the project is that it lacks support where it counts: among MPs. For reasons of tribalism and strategy, there is no emergent "Gang of Four" ready to helm a new party. In the absence of a new convulsion, the UK may turn against Brexit without the anti-Brexiteers benefiting. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.