Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Miliband and Clegg's relationship is starting to thaw (Observer)

There has been a notable political climate change behind the scenes, with the Lib Dem and Labour leaders spending more time together, writes Andrew Rawnsley.

2. 'War on terror' is a tempting defence, but it isn't that simple (Independent on Sunday)

We must understand the strange alliances in Mali to unravel its complex, conflicting loyalties, says Patrick Cockburn.

3. David Cameron had to tackle the future before the past (Sunday Telegraph)

Al-Qaeda and its affiliates mutate faster than we work out how to defeat them, writes Matthew d'Ancona.

4. Dave puts EU policy in the hands of his indulgent auntie (Mail on Sunday)

Angela Merkel wants to keep Cameron in the EU family but her willingness to indulge him is not infinite, writes James Forsyth.

5. Scottish independence is fast becoming the only option (Observer)

Even to a unionist like me, an Alex Salmond-led government is preferable to one that rewards greed and corruption, says Kevin McKenna.

6. Obama’s handed them the rope. Will Iran or Israel hang itself first? (Sunday Times) (£)

If the US were slowly to distance itself from Jerusalem, Israelis may have second thoughts about their swerve to the extreme, writes Andrew Sullivan.

7. Will practice make perfect for the PM? (Independent on Sunday)

Cameron's response to the Algeria hostage crisis fitted fluently into an interventionist foreign policy, says John Rentoul.

8. Bankers must behave - or be shackled (Mail on Sunday)

Even the near-collapse of the world financial system has not curbed this sector’s bad habits, says a Mail on Sunday editorial.

9. British fair play lies dead and buried (Observer)

In the sporting arena and in other areas of our national life, gentlemanly conduct is now an alien concept, writes Nick Cohen.

10. Norway's 'fax democracy' is nothing for Britain to fear (Sunday Telegraph)

Britain might exercise more influence over the European single market outside the EU than in it, says Christopher Booker.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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