Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Miliband and Clegg's relationship is starting to thaw (Observer)

There has been a notable political climate change behind the scenes, with the Lib Dem and Labour leaders spending more time together, writes Andrew Rawnsley.

2. 'War on terror' is a tempting defence, but it isn't that simple (Independent on Sunday)

We must understand the strange alliances in Mali to unravel its complex, conflicting loyalties, says Patrick Cockburn.

3. David Cameron had to tackle the future before the past (Sunday Telegraph)

Al-Qaeda and its affiliates mutate faster than we work out how to defeat them, writes Matthew d'Ancona.

4. Dave puts EU policy in the hands of his indulgent auntie (Mail on Sunday)

Angela Merkel wants to keep Cameron in the EU family but her willingness to indulge him is not infinite, writes James Forsyth.

5. Scottish independence is fast becoming the only option (Observer)

Even to a unionist like me, an Alex Salmond-led government is preferable to one that rewards greed and corruption, says Kevin McKenna.

6. Obama’s handed them the rope. Will Iran or Israel hang itself first? (Sunday Times) (£)

If the US were slowly to distance itself from Jerusalem, Israelis may have second thoughts about their swerve to the extreme, writes Andrew Sullivan.

7. Will practice make perfect for the PM? (Independent on Sunday)

Cameron's response to the Algeria hostage crisis fitted fluently into an interventionist foreign policy, says John Rentoul.

8. Bankers must behave - or be shackled (Mail on Sunday)

Even the near-collapse of the world financial system has not curbed this sector’s bad habits, says a Mail on Sunday editorial.

9. British fair play lies dead and buried (Observer)

In the sporting arena and in other areas of our national life, gentlemanly conduct is now an alien concept, writes Nick Cohen.

10. Norway's 'fax democracy' is nothing for Britain to fear (Sunday Telegraph)

Britain might exercise more influence over the European single market outside the EU than in it, says Christopher Booker.

Grant Shapps on the campaign trail. Photo: Getty
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Grant Shapps resigns over Tory youth wing bullying scandal

The minister, formerly party chairman, has resigned over allegations of bullying and blackmail made against a Tory activist. 

Grant Shapps, who was a key figure in the Tory general election campaign, has resigned following allegations about a bullying scandal among Conservative activists.

Shapps was formerly party chairman, but was demoted to international development minister after May. His formal statement is expected shortly.

The resignation follows lurid claims about bullying and blackmail among Tory activists. One, Mark Clarke, has been accused of putting pressure on a fellow activist who complained about his behaviour to withdraw the allegation. The complainant, Elliot Johnson, later killed himself.

The junior Treasury minister Robert Halfon also revealed that he had an affair with a young activist after being warned that Clarke planned to blackmail him over the relationship. Former Tory chair Sayeedi Warsi says that she was targeted by Clarke on Twitter, where he tried to portray her as an anti-semite. 

Shapps appointed Mark Clarke to run RoadTrip 2015, where young Tory activists toured key marginals on a bus before the general election. 

Today, the Guardian published an emotional interview with the parents of 21-year-old Elliot Johnson, the activist who killed himself, in which they called for Shapps to consider his position. Ray Johnson also spoke to BBC's Newsnight:


The Johnson family claimed that Shapps and co-chair Andrew Feldman had failed to act on complaints made against Clarke. Feldman says he did not hear of the bullying claims until August. 

Asked about the case at a conference in Malta, David Cameron pointedly refused to offer Shapps his full backing, saying a statement would be released. “I think it is important that on the tragic case that took place that the coroner’s inquiry is allowed to proceed properly," he added. “I feel deeply for his parents, It is an appalling loss to suffer and that is why it is so important there is a proper coroner’s inquiry. In terms of what the Conservative party should do, there should be and there is a proper inquiry that asks all the questions as people come forward. That will take place. It is a tragic loss of a talented young life and it is not something any parent should go through and I feel for them deeply.” 

Mark Clarke denies any wrongdoing.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.